Britain's obesity crisis: NHS spending 16m a year on 200 who are too fat to leave homeBed-ridden and needing up to four heath worker visits a day, they cost an average of 80,000 a year each63st teenager Georgia Davis was rushed to hospital last week in operation needing 40 emergency workers
On Saturday emergency services took eight hours to free 40st Russell Parkin after he fell ill at his home

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UPDATED:

09:11 GMT, 30 May 2012

At least 200 people in the UK are costing the NHS 16million because weighing 35 stone and more they are too fat to leave their home, it has been claimed.

Bed-ridden and needing up to four visits a day by health workers, they cost an average of 80,000 a year each, but this is believed to be just the tip of the iceberg.

Tam Fry of the National Obesity Forum told the Sun: 'The number of super-obese people who are housebound is in the hundreds.

Housebound: The NHS is looking after 200 people who, like Georgia Davis, have become so obese they are not able to leave their homes

Housebound: The NHS is looking after 200 people who, like Georgia Davis, have become so obese they are not able to leave their homes

'They are hidden in the care system and no one knows exactly how many there are. It really is a tragedy.'

Britain's worsening obesity crisis has been brought to the forefront of public attention after 63st teenager Georgia Davis was rushed to hospital last week in an operation involving 40 emergency workers.

It cost an estimated 100,000 as firefighters spent eight hours demolished two walls of her home in Aberdare, South Wales, to free her from her first-floor bedroom.

And yesterday reports told how 17 firefighters and paramedics battled for eight hours to free 40st Russell Parkin after he fell ill at his home in New Eltham, south east London.

The 41-year-old was dragged downstairs from his second-floor flat in a giant bowl-shaped 'sledge' by 15 men before being lifted into a reinforced ambulance.

Too heavy for pall bearers: It took four hours to lower the body of 52st Christian Jeffrey into the ground - another example of the effect the obese are having on British life

Too heavy for pall bearers: It took four hours
to lower the body of 52st Christian Jeffrey into the ground – another
example of the effect the obese are having

Over half of all British people are
now so fat they are considered overweight or obese, with related
illnesses costing the NHS more than 4billion a year and leaving
services struggling to cope.

'The number of super-obese people who are housebound is in the hundreds.They are hidden in the care system and no one knows exactly how many there are' Tam Fry, National Obesity Forum

Some
health trusts have revealed that patients have had to be sent to zoo
vets for body scans, and the NHS in Yorkshire has already spent
10million on beefed up ambulances and stretchers.

The
nations undertakers, cemeteries and crematoriums are also facing huge
pressures with dealing with their newly giant clients who have eaten
themselves into an early grave.

Some
have had to use the cranes more typically seen on building sites to
lower coffins the size of wardrobes into specially widened burial plots.