'Codswallop! Don't lie to me, Mr Lansley': Fury of pensioner who confronted Health Secretary outside NHS meeting75-year-old June Hautot said she'd 'had enough' of Andrew Lansley
Opponents to Health Bill have been shut out from Downing Street, claims Shadow Health SecretaryHealth Minister accuses Labour of turning NHS reforms into 'game of political football'Prime Minister accused of playing 'divide and rule'

The Health Secretary was accused of talking ‘codswallop’ in a confrontation with an angry pensioner outside Downing Street today.

Arriving
at a summit to rescue his NHS reforms, Andrew Lansley was berated by
75-year-old June Hautot for privatising the health service.

She jabbed her finger at him, shouting: 'Codswallop, Don’t lie to me, I’m sick of you.'

The former Unison branch secretary refused to back down as Mr Lansley tried to get through the security gates at Downing Street.

Mrs Hautot, who described Mr Lansley as ‘gutless’ and a ‘coward’ said: 'I’ve had enough of you.'

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Anger: June Hautot confronted Health Secretary Andrew Lansley about his health reforms as he arrived at Downing Street

Anger: June Hautot confronted Health Secretary Andrew Lansley about his health reforms as he arrived at Downing Street

Accusation: Mrs Hautot said Mr Lansley was 'privatising the NHS' with his controversial bill

Accusation: Mrs Hautot said Mr Lansley was 'privatising the NHS' with his controversial bill

HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE BILL AS IT STANDS…

All 152 Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) in England will be scrapped along with the ten Strategic Health Authorities (SHAs).

In preparation, PCTs have merged into 50 clusters and SHAs have formed four super hubs.

GPs to take over management of 80% of NHS budget from April 2013. Some consortia already set up.

National board will oversee the new system as well as taking charge of specialists' services. Will be headed by Sir David Nicholson who is current NHS chief executive.

Patients allowed to choose where they are treated – including free private care if necessary.

Councils and public given new powers to stop local A&E and maternity units closing.

Far more NHS operations and treatments provided by private companies and charities.

Hit squads of matrons sent into hospitals to check on elderly care.

Mr Lansley has tabled more than 100 amendments to the bill, which has been passed by the Commons, in an effort to push it through the Lords.

Earlier,
David Cameron had been accused of deepening divisions in the health
service after it emerged that opponents of controversial NHS reforms
were excluded from the key summit.

The Prime Minister, who insisted he
was 'committed' to pushing through the Government's reforms, met with
chairs of the emerging GP-led clinical commissioning groups along with
other health officials.

However,
eight royal colleges and several health unions – who have all
previously criticised the reforms – said they had not received an
invitation to the meeting, which is intended to shore up support for the
Health and Social Care Bill.

There were only 14 people around the Cabinet table in 10 Downing Street for today’s summit, including Mr Lansley and Mr Cameron.

And even as the meeting began, Number 10 officials were still refusing to identify those taking part.

Mr
Cameron told the meeting: 'It’s never been the case that just trusting
the founding principles (of the NHS) and providing the funding is
enough. We have to think of the future.'

Outside,
bodies representing doctors and nurses, including the British Medical
Association and the Royal College of Nurses, complained they had been
'locked out' of the meeting because they disagreed with the sweeping
reforms.

Asked if the heckling of Mr Lansley
as he arrived at Downing Street for the talks was proof of the level of
hostility to the reforms, the Prime Minister said: 'Reform is never
easy, but it is vital to reform our NHS because I want it to be there
looking after every family in the country and doing a good job into the
future.

'We had a constructive and helpful
meeting and what's clear is that there are quite a few myths that we
need to bust about this reform.

'Choice for patients is a good thing: making sure that GPs, not bureaucrats, are making decisions, that's a good thing.

'So there are myths we need to bust,
but I also heard how, on the ground, where some of the reforms are
already taking place, you are actually seeing better health outcomes,
GPs doing more things for their patients, people living healthier lives
as a result of these changes.'

Meanwhile, Labour leader Ed Miliband
accused the Government of adopting a 'bunker mentality' to reforms,
calling on the PM to dump the Bill and convene new talks on the future
of the NHS bringing together all sides of the debate.

David Cameron, who sat nest to the Health Secretary during today's summit, reiterated his belief in Mr Lansley's reforms

David Cameron, who sat nest to the Health Secretary during today's summit, reiterated his belief in Mr Lansley's reforms

He said: 'The Prime Minister is
holding a Downing Street summit which excludes those from the medical
profession who disagree with his Bill,' he said. 'I have to say I think
this bunker mentality is the wrong way to run the NHS.'

Speaking as the meeting ended, Mr Cameron said that there were 'a few myths we need to bust' about the planned reforms.

He insisted he would not be blown off course: 'I am committed to the changes and committed to taking them through.

'We need to do everything we can to
explain to people that this is about improving and enhancing our NHS,
not in any way endangering it.'

WHY IS THE BMA OPPOSED TO THE HEALTH BILL

The BMA says major areas have not been addressed to its satisfaction. These include:

/02/20/article-2103572-11D3D232000005DC-802_634x422.jpg” width=”634″ height=”422″ alt=”It appeared that only health bodies who have not opposed the reforms were invited to the meeting at Downing Street” class=”blkBorder” />

It appeared that only health bodies who have not opposed the reforms were invited to the meeting at Downing Street

Mr Lansley had to run a gauntlet of abuse from protesters as he arrived at today's meeting

Mr Lansley had to run a gauntlet of abuse from protesters as he arrived at today's meeting

'They deserved a hearing – not to have the door of Downing Street shut in their faces,' he said.

Health minister Simon Burns has denied that key bodies were being excluded from talks on the Bill.

He said: 'This (summit) is part of an
ongoing dialogue. We have had hundreds of meetings, there have been
thousands of people involved in talking and looking into different ways
of improving and engaging on the Health Bill.

'That includes the RCN,' he told BBC Radio 4's Today programme.

The Prime Minister's official spokesman later added: 'We are not excluding anyone,' at a daily Westminster briefing.

However, all those bodies who confirmed attendance today have yet to directly oppose the Bill.

These
include the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, which will
set out its position on the Bill in the next few days following a
membership survey.

The
Royal College of Surgeons, which has agreed to 'critical engagement with
Government' over the Bill also attended the meeting, as did the
Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, which has concerns
but has agreed to continue talks with ministers.

The
Royal College of Anaesthetists also went, as did the Royal College
of Physicians, which has pledged to continue discussions with the
Government.

Lib Dem MP
Andrew George, a leading critic of the reforms, said: 'If the intention
of today’s Summit is to draw attention to just how pitifully unloved and
friendless the Health Bill now is amongst clinicians and patient
groups, then this is a very good way of going about it.

Labour leader Ed Miliband (left) and shadow health secretary Andy Burnham during a visit to the Royal Bolton Hospital on Friday. Mr Burnham said opponents to the Bill 'deserved a hearing'

Labour leader Ed Miliband (left) and shadow health secretary Andy Burnham during a visit to the Royal Bolton Hospital on Friday. Mr Burnham said opponents to the Health Bill 'deserved a hearing'

In a separate front, 13 Liberal Democrat MPs including a Cabinet minister’s aide broke ranks to demand the publication of a secret report on the risks involved in the reforms.

Duncan Hames, the PPS to new Energy Secretary Ed Davey, was among a group that signed a Labour-led Commons motion against an embargo on a confidential Risk Register, written by civil servants on possible side-effects of the highly controversial NHS and Social Care Bill.

He told the Evening Standard: 'In my experience, working with organisations on risk management, the act of registering risks prompts an organisation to put in place strategies to minimise them. Publishing the risk register ought to reassure people that we are concerned about those possible risks.'

Labour will attempt to tempt the MPs into a full-scale rebellion the issue by putting down a motion on Wednesday. Shadow health secretary Andy Burnham said: 'There are lots of Liberal Democrats who agree with us that the risk register should be published now so that it can inform the Commons debate on these Tory-led reforms.'

John Pugh, who chairs the Liberal Democrat backbench health committee also signed the motion. He said some Lib Dems might rebel 'If there is a vote on a motion that follows closely the one we have signed, then an appreciable number of Liberal Democrats may wish to support it,' he said.
Mr Pugh said the reforms would cause 'anarchy' in the NHS.

A Lib Dem rebellion at this stage would raise serious coalition tensions over the Bill. The party’s spring conference in three weeks’ time is likely to be dominated by the issue. Last year, Lib Dem opposition led to Mr Cameron calling a 'pause' in the Bill for major concessions.

A Department of Health spokesman defended |Mr Lansley’s decision not to publish the risk register. 'We believe that their publication would risk seriously damaging the quality of advice given to ministers and of any subsequent decision making,' he said.

Mr Cameron was meeting a range of doctors and managers involved in new commissioning bodies this afternoon. But there was a new row because leading critics of the Bill, including the British Medical Association and Royal College of Nursing, said they were being barred from the event.

Dr Clare Gerada, of the Royal College of GPs, said she was 'puzzled' over the lack of an invitation to the summit for her organisation.

'I’m a little bit worried that what’s happening is we are shooting the messenger rather than listening to the messages we are bringing on behalf of patients, GPs, nurses and a whole host of people who are very, very worried about this health bill.'

Health minister Simon Burns said only organisations 'who are constructively engaged in implementing the modernisation' had been invited.

The Prime Minister was expected to highlight research showing fewer emergency hospital admissions as evidence that the reforms are already working. Department of Health figures show a 0.5 per cent decline in 2011, compared with a 36 per cent increase between 2001 and 2010.