Coil 'could be a more effective form of emergency contraception than the Morning-after pill'
Women who took emergency contraceptive pills after unprotected sex were up to 20 times more likely to get pregnant compared with those who had IUD inserted

|

UPDATED:

15:07 GMT, 9 May 2012

Girls as young as 11 should be fitted with coils to reduce teenage pregnancies, claim researchers.

They say that handing out supplies of the morning-after pill does nothing to reduce rates of prevent abortions or unwanted babies.

Instead, academics from Princeton University in the US believe schoolgirls should be routinely fitted with IUD coils as they are at least ten times more effective.

IUDs have a failure rate of just 0.09 per cent

IUDs have a failure rate of just 0.09 per cent but must be inserted by a medic

WHAT IS AN IUD

An intrauterine device is a small, T-shaped contraceptive device made from plastic and copper that fits inside the womb.

It's a long-lasting and reversible method of contraception but can't stop you getting a sexually transmitted infections.

An IUD stops sperm from reaching the egg. It does this by releasing copper, which changes the make-up of the fluids in the womb and fallopian tubes. These changes prevent sperm from fertilising eggs.

IUDs may also stop fertilised eggs from travelling along the fallopian tubes and implanting in the womb.

It takes about 20 minutes for a doctor or nurse to insert an IUD in the womb.

They can be used as an emergency form of contraception up to five days after unprotected sex.

Source: NHS

And they point out that young girls
often forget to take the morning-after pill or just assume it’s not
necessary, even when they’ve had unprotected sex.

/05/09/article-2141813-0036E36500000258-311_468x356.jpg” width=”468″ height=”356″ alt=”Women who took emergency contraceptive pills have unprotected sex were up to 20 times more likely to fall pregnant compared to those who had an IUD inserted” class=”blkBorder” />

Women who took emergency contraceptive pills after unprotected sex were up to 20 times more likely to fall pregnant compared to those who had an IUD inserted

In 2010 the National Institute for
Health and Clinical Excellence issued NHS guidelines stating the doctors
and pharmacies ensure girls are able to obtain ‘advance provision’ of
the morning after pill.

And last Christmas the British
Pregnancy Advisory Service abortion provider ran a campaign enabling
women to get advanced stocks of the morning-after pill delivered for
free.

Coils have to be fitted by specially-trained doctors or nurses at GP surgeries or family planning centres.

The procedure takes around 20 minutes and some women may find it painful.