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Covered in wild flowers, the new state-of-the-art children's hospital built in a PARK
The new 237m Alder Hey children's hospital will be built in a park Will have views of green space or parkland from every patient’s window Is the first new private
finance initiative (PFI) hospital since the coalition government came into power
three years ago

By
Anna Hodgekiss

PUBLISHED:

17:12 GMT, 25 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

17:40 GMT, 25 March 2013

These images show the new state-of-the-art children's hospital at Alder Hey Hospital in Liverpool – to be built in a park.

The new 237m hospital, which has been designed with the help of children and young
people, will have 270 beds, including 48 critical care beds.

The hospital, which will stand next
door to the current Victorian site, is the first new private
finance initiative (PFI) hospital since the coalition government came into power
three years ago.

It will sit in the heart of Springfield Park, creating
views of green space or parkland from every patient’s window.

Tranquil: The new 237m Alder Hey Children's Hospital will be built in a park and be covered in wild flowers

Tranquil: The new 237m Alder Hey Children's Hospital will be built in a park and be covered in wild flowers

The new Alder Hey in the Park hospital will have 270 beds, including 48 critical care beds. The majority of children and their families will have their own room with en-suite facilities

The new Alder Hey in the Park hospital will have 270 beds, including 48 critical care beds. The majority of children and their families will have their own room with en-suite facilities

Once the
new hospital is built, the old one will be demolished and the site
landscaped.

Scheduled to open in 2015, there will also be 16 operating
theatres, four for day-case surgery and 12 inpatient theatres.

Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust provides care for over 275,000
children and young people every year.

Each year, approximately 60,000
children visit its A&E department (the busiest of its kind in the
country) while over 30,000 attend as outpatients.

The majority of children and their families
will have their own room with en-suite facilities and each ward will
have its own kitchen providing freshly cooked food to order.

It will be built by a consortium comprising the construction firms John Laing, Laing O’Rourke and Interserve.

Greenery: The hospital will sit in the heart of Springfield Park, Liverpool

Greenery: The hospital will sit in the heart of Springfield Park, Liverpool

Landmark: It is the first large-scale healthcare project to get the go-ahead in three years

Landmark: It is the first large-scale healthcare project to get the go-ahead in three years

As with most PFI deals, the trust will pay off the debt over a 30-year
period and it will be structured so as to stay off the government’s
balance sheet, the Financial Times reported.

The paper also reported that the sign-off by the government suggests it will proceed will further PFI schemes, despite the controversy surrounding them.

Just last week, MailOnline reported how the new 545 million hospital in Birmingham built under the controversial PFI scheme has
run out of beds, forcing bosses to re-open wards on the hospital it
replaced.

Unprecedented demand on A&E admissions at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham means two wards will be brought back into action at the neighbouring old Queen Elizabeth Hospital, which was built in the 1930s and closed in 2010.

Once the new hospital is built, the old Victorian building will be demolished and the site landscaped

Once the new hospital is built, the old Victorian building will be demolished and the site landscaped

PFI schemes were a key part of the Labour government's modernisation programme for hospitals.

Under the schemes, private firms paid for the building of new hospitals, with trusts repaying them over 30 or more years, with interest.

But due to the nature of the deals, the ultimate total cost is often far more than the value of the assets.

But the Treasury told the Financial Times that it had 'not planned to withdraw PFI schemes
already in the pipeline'.