A hero humiliated: Hospital left veteran, 94, in bloody pyjamas for FIVE hoursRod Gray was taken to Ipswich Hospital after falling over at home
Had split his head open was suffering from shock and a head injury
His family claim he was left alone, needing the toilet and in distress
Mr Gray said he felt 'humiliated' by lack of dignity with which he was treatedThe hospital says it was very busy that evening but it is investigating

By
John Stevens

PUBLISHED:

12:19 GMT, 12 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

01:20 GMT, 13 March 2013

An elderly war hero was left sitting in a casualty department in his blood-soaked pyjamas for more than five hours while he waited to be seen by a doctor.

Rod Gray, 94, had been taken to hospital by ambulance after he cut his head in a fall at his home.

After having his wound treated with surgical ‘glue’, he was abandoned in a wheelchair in a waiting area, alone and desperate for the toilet.

Two years ago the Care Quality Commission found the hospital was failing in the care of elderly patients, with a lack of dignity cited as a serious concern

Two years ago the Care Quality Commission found the hospital was failing in the care of elderly patients, with a lack of dignity cited as a serious concern

Mr Gray, who served in the Suffolk Regiment in Burma during the Second World War, suffered head injuries and shock when he fell

Mr Gray, who served in the Suffolk Regiment in Burma during the Second World War, suffered head injuries and shock when he fell

When his family arrived at the Ipswich
Hospital, they were repeatedly told that he would be seen next, but
after five hours they took him home so they could clean him up
themselves.

Mr Gray, who was awarded the Burma
Star for helping to defeat the Japanese in the Second World War, said he
felt ‘humiliated’ by the treatment he received.

Last night, his stepson Carl Puiy, 55, said he was ‘absolutely fuming’ about the lack of care shown by the hospital last Friday.

The retired Suffolk Police
superintendent said: ‘He was on his own with pyjamas and a dressing gown
on. It was not very dignified. There was blood all over him – they
hadn’t even cleaned him up.’

‘We asked what was going on and were
told he needed to see a doctor. He was asking to go home because he
wanted to lie down – he was so uncomfortable and said he felt
humiliated.’

Rod Gray, 94, was left in blood soaked pyjamas for five hours by Ipswich Hospital

Rod Gray, 94, was left in blood soaked pyjamas for five hours by Ipswich Hospital

Mr Gray, a retired accountant with the
Eastern Electricity Board, was admitted to the hospital at around
4.30pm. Mr Puiy and his sister arrived within the hour.

Mr Puiy said: ‘At 8.20pm we were told
he was next to be seen. I do understand they were very busy and had
emergency cases to see.

‘But the problem seemed to be
administrative staff on the front desk who didn’t seem to be doing
anything to check if a doctor could see my 94-year-old stepfather.

‘By 10pm he still hadn’t been seen. We had to take him home.

‘We gave up as he was pleading with us to go home.

‘He was so uncomfortable and cold. All
he wanted to do was lie down.’ He added: ‘When we lifted him out of the
wheelchair his legs had gone numb and they gave way from under him.’

Ipswich Hospital says that it has launched a full investigation into the case

Ipswich Hospital says that it has launched a full investigation into the case

Mr Puiy said that he believes that his
stepfather, who served in the Suffolk Regiment as part of General Bill
Slim’s ‘Forgotten’ 14th Army in Burma, deserved better treatment.

He said: ‘I have worked in the public
sector myself and I can’t believe a 94-year-old man could be left in a
wheelchair in his pyjamas.

‘It is a complete lack of dignity for
someone who has fought bravely for his country and put his life on the
line. They couldn’t even find him somewhere to lie down.’

Last night, Jan Ingle, a hospital spokesman, said: ‘The emergency department was exceptionally busy on Friday afternoon.

‘We had to see people according to
their clinical priority and so it could well be the case Mr Gray waited
longer than we would want anyone to wait.’

Two years ago the Care Quality
Commission found the hospital was failing in the care of elderly
patients, with a lack of dignity cited as a serious concern.