Couple have longed-for son following five failed cycles of IVF – all thanks to a drip containing EGG YOLK
Hannah and Simon spent five years trying to conceive a childThey decided to try egg and soya solution for final attemptHannah became pregnant and gave birth to Noah in late 2012

and it worked.'

Hannah with baby Noah: She was given a drip-feed egg solution, which may have stabilised her immune system

Hannah with baby Noah: She was given a drip-feed egg solution, which may have stabilised her immune system

Hannah had a condition that meant her body was attacking the embryos, causing her to miscarry. The egg solution helps to stabilise the immune system by making it harder for the body to attack a fertilised embryo.

Hannah found out about the treatment through the CARE Fertility Group in Manchester after carrying out research on fertility websites. And after paying for blood tests to be carried out in America, she was advised to try the 400-a-time procedure, which isn't available on the NHS.

Known as ‘intralipid
infusion therapy’, the blend of soya oil and egg products is high in
calories and essential fatty acids and is thought to have a stabilising effect on cell membranes, which makes it
harder for killer cells to attack.

It is usually used as a nutritional
boost for post-operative patients and premature babies, but studies have shown the concoction has a
remarkable success rate at overcoming Mrs Cope's condition.

In 2011, Dr George Ndukwe, formerly of the Care fertility clinic in Nottingham trialled the therapy on a group of 50 women who had failed
to become pregnant despite enduring an average of six IVF attempts
each.

Half of those treated became pregnant,
compared with just 9 per cent of those not given the fatty substance.
The findings were presented at a British Fertility Society conference.

However, a review from King's College London, said larger-scale controlled studies would be needed to confirm the findings before it could be recommended for routine use.

A spokesman for CARE Fertility, has said it offers the therapy to women if they think
their only problem in getting pregnant is an over-active immune system.

The treatment is always administered by a qualified nurse under a doctor’s instructions.

FATTY DRIP THAT MAY STABILISE A PREGNANT WOMAN'S IMMUNE SYSTEM

Intralipid
infusion therapy has been around for decades as a way to correct an essential fatty acid and calorie deficiency among those who are unable to eat normally.

The solution contains 20 per cent soyabean oil, 1.2 per cent egg yolk phospholipids, 2.25 per cent glycerin and water.

Given via an intravenous
infusion it bypasses the stomach and goes directly into the bloodstream
to supply the body with several essential fatty acids. These are
substances that can't be made by the body but are required for many biological functions, including
reproduction.

Recently, doctors began to wonder whether it could be used to boost women who had immune systems that attacked their own embryos.

In 2011 a mother from Derbyshire became one of the first women to be treated with the infusion alongside IVF. Suzanne Harper, from Ilkeston, conceived baby Libby after having the experimental treatment.

She was one of the 50 women treated in a trial run by Dr George Ndukwe, formerly of the Care fertility clinic in Nottingham. The women had all failed
to become pregnant after an average of six IVF attempts – yet half conceived after having the infusion.

It is thought the food solution has a stabilising effect on cell membranes, which makes it
harder for killer cells to attack.

However, a review from King's College London, said larger-scale controlled studies would be needed to confirm the findings before it could be recommended for routine use.