Just one soft drink a day raises men's risk of aggressive prostate cancer by 40 per centThose who drank one 330ml can a day were much more likely to require treatment for a serious form of cancer
Men who ate a diet heavy in pasta, rice, and sugary cereal had increased chance of milder form of disease

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UPDATED:

12:00 GMT, 27 November 2012


A study has found it could take just one soft drink a day to increase the risk of prostate cancer by 40 per cent

A study has found it could take just one soft drink a day to increase the risk of prostate cancer by 40 per cent

Men who drink fizzy drinks are not just ruining their teeth and waistlines – they could be at risk of aggressive prostate cancer as well.

A Swedish study has found just one soft drink a day could increase the risk of developing more serious forms of the cancer by 40 per cent.

Experts at Lund University also found those who ate a carbohydrate diet heavy in rice and pasta increased their risk of getting
milder forms of prostate cancer, which often required no treatment, by
31 per cent.

And eating lots of sugary breakfast cereals raised the
incidence of milder forms of the cancer to 38 per cent

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men after lung disease.

The study, which will be published in the upcoming edition of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, examined more than 8,000 men aged between 45 and73 for an average of 15 years.

Isabel Drake, a PhD student at Lund University, said: 'Among the men who drank a lot of soft drinks or other drinks with added sugar, we saw an increased risk of prostate cancer of around 40 per cent.'

The men in the study had to undergo regular medical examinations and kept a journal of their food and drink intake.

Those who drank one 330ml soft drink a day were 40 per cent more likely to develop more serious forms of prostate cancer that required treatment.

The cancer was discovered after the men showed symptoms of the disease, and not through the Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA).

Experts at Lund University also found those who ate a carbohydrate diet heavy in rice and pasta increased their risk of getting milder forms of prostate cancer

Experts at Lund University also found those who ate a carbohydrate diet heavy in rice and pasta increased their risk of getting milder forms of prostate cancer

Ms Drake said while further research was needed before dietary guidelines could be changed, there were already plenty of reasons to curtail soft-drink consumption.

Recent studies have shown fizzy and soft drink consumption has been linked to osteoarthritis, an 80 per cent increased risk of stroke in women.

Previous studies have shown that Chinese and Japanese immigrants in the US develop prostate cancer more often than peers in their home countries.

Further research on how genes respond to different diets would make it possible to 'tailor food and drink guidelines for certain high-risk groups, ' Drake said.