Mini marathons: Tireless toddlers cover more than two and a half miles a day (but that includes 102 falls)If the average toddler is active half of their waking time, they will clock up 2.6 miles a dayResearchers filmed over 130 infants as they explored specially-designed playroomAnalysis showed those who walked clocked up 2,368 steps an hour, covering 0.44 miles<br>

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By
Daily Mail Reporter</p>
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<strong>PUBLISHED:</strong>

00:45 GMT, 23 November 2012

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<strong>UPDATED:</strong>

10:56 GMT, 23 November 2012

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<img src="http://www.big-wife.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/12b6article-0-03FA9A9C0000044D-253_233x475.jpg" width="233" height="475" alt="Tireless toddlers: The average toddler walks more than 2.5miles a day" class="blkBorder" />
<p class="imageCaption">Tireless toddlers: The average toddler walks more than 2.5miles a day</p>
<p>They may be called baby steps but don&#8217;t be fooled: the average toddler walks more than two and a half miles a day.</p><p>The distance – which would put many adults to shame – is made of 14,208 steps.</p><p>Perhaps less surprisingly, it also includes 102 falls.</p><p>To come up with the figures, the New York University researchers videoed more than 130 infants aged between 12 and 19 months as they explored a specially-designed playroom.</p><p>Another 15 were taped at home.</p><p>Some were &#8216;expert crawlers&#8217; who had yet to start to walk. Some had just taken their first steps and a few had been toddling around for months.</p><p>Frame-by-frame analysis showed those who walked to clock up an average of 2,368 steps an hour and cover 0.44 miles.</p><p>They also fell an average of 17 times an hour.</p><p>Perhaps not surprisingly, the new walkers had the most tumbles, with one unlucky soul racking up 69 falls an hour.</p><p>The US researchers calculated that if the average toddler is active half of their waking time, they will clock up 2.6 miles a day.</p><p>Importantly, the figures for children in playroom were similar to those at home, meaning the totals couldn&#8217;t be explained away by those in the playroom being excited by the sight of new toys.</p><p>

</p><p>They also compared 12-month-old crawlers and walkers to establish why babies start to walk when they can already get around well on all fours.</p><p>Although the new walkers fell more, they also moved much further. So, step-for-step, they were no more likely to take a tumble than babies of the same age who only crawled.</p>
<img src="http://www.big-wife.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/0842article-0-06C15204000005DC-717_233x423.jpg" width="233" height="423" alt="Estimates for other new skills are 'equally enormous' and middle-class infants hear 2,150 words an hour" class="blkBorder" />
<p class="imageCaption">Estimates for other new skills are 'equally enormous' and middle-class infants hear 2,150 words an hour</p>
<p>Professor Karen Adolph, a psychologist specialising in infant learning, said: &#8216;How do infants learn to walk </p><p>&#8216;Over days of walking, they take more steps, travel further distances and fall less, </p><p>&#8216;And they may be motivated to walk in the first place because walking takes them further faster than crawling without increasing the risk of falling.</p><p>&#8216;Assessments indicate that new walkers reap all the benefits of an upright posture without incurring an additional risk of falling.</p><p>&#8216;Thus, part of the answer to &#8220;why walk&#8221; is &#8220;why not&#8221;.&#8217; </p><p>The professor added that while number of steps taken may seem high, estimates for other new skills are &#8216;equally enormous&#8217; </p><p>Writing in the journal Psychological Science, she said: &#8216;Middle-class infants hear 2,150 words per hour, more than 30million words by three years.</p><p>&#8216;By two months of age, infants have executed more than 2.5million eye movements and by three and a half months, they have performed 3 to 6million.&#8217; </p><p>And, just as for professional athletes and musicians, it is likely that practice makes perfect.</p><p>&#8216;The consensus in the literature on expertise is that large amounts of regular practice, accumulated over years of training, promote expert performance.</p><p>&#8216;The same principle could apply to acquiring expertise in walking.&#8217;</p><br><p> </p>