Once-a-year drug could spell the end of daily insulin injections for type 2 diabetics

Once-a-year drug could spell the end of daily insulin injections for type 2 diabetics
A newly discovered hormone – betatrophin – could revolutionise the treatment of type 2 diabetesIt could halt the development of the conditionIn mice the hormone was shown to increase the number of insulin-producing beta cells up to 30-fold

By
Fiona Macrae Science Correspondent

PUBLISHED:

16:00 GMT, 25 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

16:04 GMT, 25 April 2013

Diabetics could be freed from the need to inject themselves by the development of a once-a-year drug

Diabetics could be freed from the need to inject themselves by the development of a once-a-year drug

Millions of diabetics could be freed from the need to inject themselves several times a day by the development of a once-a-year drug.

Scientists have discovered a hormone that could ‘dramatically’ improve the treatment of the condition that is becoming increasingly common as waistlines expand.

The researchers, from Harvard University in the U.S., said: ‘If this could be used in people, it could eventually mean that instead of taking insulin injections three times a day, you might be able to take this hormone once a week or once a month, or in the best case, maybe once a year.’

The work is still at an early stage but it is thought that the betatrophin hormone may even have the power to halt type 2 diabetes in its tracks.

In people with type 2, or adult-onset diabetes, cells in the pancreas do not make enough insulin – a hormone key in the conversion of sugar into energy – and the insulin they do make does not work properly.

The condition is often controlled initially with a stringent diet and exercise regime but many sufferers will see their health worsen over time and will eventually need tablets or insulin injections.

Rather than simply giving insulin, the Harvard researchers looked for a way of boosting its production in the body.

This led them to a hormone that they christened betatrophin.

Given to mice, it raised numbers of insulin-producing beta cells up to 30-fold, the journal Cell reports.

Excitingly, the ‘enormous’ number of new cells only made insulin when needed – something that should lead to more natural blood sugar levels and better health.

Complications of high blood sugar include heart disease, blindness, kidney disease and nerve and circulatory damage, which at its worst can lead to amputations.

Researcher Professor Doug Melton said the discovery had left him so excited that he could hardly sleep.

Given to mice, the new hormone raised numbers of insulin-producing beta cells up to 30-fold

Given to mice, the new hormone raised numbers of insulin-producing beta cells up to 30-fold

He added: ‘Our idea is relatively simple.

‘We would provide this hormone, the type 2 diabetic will make more of their insulin-producing cells and this will slow down, if not stop, the progression of their diabetes.’

Drug companies have already seized on the idea and the hormone could be tested on people for the first time in as little as three years.

However, the need to show it to be safe and effective in large numbers of people means it is around a decade away from the market.

It is thought that one in 20 Britons has diabetes, with type 2 accounting for 90 per cent of the cases.

Although the US breakthrough is mainly aimed at this form of the condition it may also be useful in treating the other form, type 1 diabetes, which usually develops in childhood or adolescence.

More tests needed to confirm that man was killed in measles epidemic

South Wales measles cases reach 942 as tests into death of 25-year-old 'first victim' are inconclusive
Measles cases in the region have jumped by 56 in the last two days
Gareth Williams was suffering with measles at the time of his deathBut tests have been unable to confirm the virus was responsible for deathCoroner has ordered further examinations in order to determine cause

.

A major vaccination programme continues unabated in Wales which has so far seen 83 people admitted to hospital due to the illness since the outbreak.

Although the outbreak is centred mainly on Swansea, rates of measles are high throughout the Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University, Powys and Hywel Dda health board areas, especially in Neath Port Talbot and North Powys.

Health officials have also launched a nationwide programme to help stem the measles outbreak and prevent it spreading more widely across the UK.

At least a million children and teenagers are to be vaccinated against measles in an attempt to stop expected outbreaks in England.

Some will never have had a jab, while others have only had the first of two doses of the MMR vaccine.

The 20million campaign follows a big rise in cases in South Wales, where public health officials have been running clinics to increase protection rates.

Could Facebook help predict obesity hotspots? Areas where people "like" TV more than sport are less healthy

Could Facebook help predict obesity hotspots Areas where people 'like' TV more than sport are less healthy People with television-related Facebook 'interests' more likely to be obeseThose related to a healthy lifestyle are less likely to have weight issues
People's online ‘interests’ could help predict and map obesity rates by area

By
Emma Innes

PUBLISHED:

13:27 GMT, 25 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

13:27 GMT, 25 April 2013

Facebook could be a key tool in mapping which geographical areas have the most overweight and obese people.

American researchers have found that the higher the percentage of people in a city or town with Facebook ‘interests’ suggesting a healthy lifestyle, the lower that area's obesity rate.

At the same time, areas with a large percentage of Facebook users with television-related interests tend to have higher rates of obesity.

People with Facebook 'interests' that suggest a healthy, active lifestyle are less likely to be overweight than those with television-related 'interests'

People with Facebook 'interests' that suggest a healthy, active lifestyle are less likely to be overweight than those with television-related 'interests'

Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital, in the U.S., drew these conclusions after comparing Facebook user data with data from national and New York City-focused health surveys.

They looked at what Facebook users posted to their timeline, ‘liked’ and shared with others.

They then compared the percentage of users interested in healthy activities or television with details of Body Mass Index in the same area.

The comparison revealed close geographic relationships between Facebook ‘interests’ and obesity rates.

For instance, the obesity rate was 12 per cent lower in the location in the United States where the highest percentage of Facebook users expressing activity-related ‘interests’ compared with that in the location with the lowest percentage.

Similarly, the obesity rate in the location with the highest percentage of users with television-related interests nationally was 3.9 per cent higher than the location with the lowest percentage.

The same correlation was reflected in the New York City neighbourhood data as well, showing that the approach can scale from national to local level data.

The obesity rate on Coney Island, which had the highest percentage of activity-related ‘interests’ in the city, was 7.2 per cent lower than Southwest Queens, the neighbourhood with the lowest percentage.

The higher the percentage of people in a city or town with Facebook 'interests' suggesting a healthy lifestyle, the lower that area's obesity rate

The higher the percentage of people in a city or town with Facebook 'interests' suggesting a healthy lifestyle, the lower that area's obesity rate

At the same time, the obesity rate in Northeast Bronx, the neighbourhood with the highest percentage of television-related ‘interests’, was 27.5 per cent higher than that in the neighbourhood with the lowest percentage – Greenpoint.

They now believe that people's online ‘interests’ could help public health researchers predict, track and map obesity rates by area.

The amount of data available from social networks like Facebook makes it possible to efficiently carry out research with cohorts of a size that was previously impossible.

Dr John Brownstein, from Boston Children’s Hospital, explained: ‘Online social networks like Facebook represent a new high-value, low-cost data stream for looking at health at a population level.

People's online 'interests' could help public health researchers predict, track and map obesity rates by area

People's online 'interests' could help public health researchers predict, track and map obesity rates by area

‘The tight correlation between Facebook users' “interests” and obesity data suggest that this kind of social network analysis could help generate real-time estimates of obesity levels in an area, help target public health campaigns that would promote healthy behaviour change, and assess the success of those campaigns.’

These findings come just after it was revealed that communicating with friends on Facebook is not a substitute for seeing friends face-to-face.

Researchers at the University of Chester found that people are happier and laugh 50 per cent more when talking face-to-face with friends than when they use social networking sites.

Dr Sam Roberts, senior lecturer at the University of Chester, said such websites don’t appear to help people make true friendships.

Based on two questionnaires, he found there was no link between Facebook use and people with larger groups of friends or more emotionally intense relationships.

The mother and daughter who were diagnosed with breast cancer on the same day

The mother and daughter who were diagnosed with breast cancer on the SAME DAY
Karen Williams and Diane Leach also had surgery on the same dayWere both diagnosed in February last year and are now recovering
Having a mother who had breast cancer doubles a woman's risk

By
Emma Innes

PUBLISHED:

10:57 GMT, 25 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

14:02 GMT, 25 April 2013

Karen Williams and her mother, Diane Leach, were both diagnosed with breast cancer on the same day

Karen Williams and her mother, Diane Leach, were both diagnosed with breast cancer on the same day

A mother and daughter are recovering after both were diagnosed with breast cancer on the same day.

Karen Williams and her mother, Diane Leach, also underwent surgery on the same day as each other, with the same surgeon.

When they were recovering they were in adjacent wards and could knock on the wall to communicate.

Both were diagnosed in February last year after finding lumps in their right breasts.

Mrs Williams told of the moment when she and partner, Stuart Burnside, went to tell her mother she'd sound a pea-sized lump while showering.

'I told her I'd found a lump, and she said so have I. I thought she was joking.

'I went to my GP and she went to hers. I went for a mammogram a few days later and didn't realise my mum was also going. My partner Stuart saw her as we were in the queue.'

She added: 'I was showering when I felt a lump.

'I didn't like the feel of it. Straight away I thought it
was cancer. I went to Stuart and said I knew I had it. I just kept
thinking oh my God.

'The doctor thought it might just be a cyst and sent
me for a mammogram, but I knew.'

Mother and daughter are now well on the way to recovery after their treatment at the Countess of Chester Hospital, in Cheshire.

Amazingly, their cancers were not caused by a faulty gene and were not hereditary.

‘It was a crazy situation last year to both be diagnosed on the same day and my two sisters and my dad didn’t know what to do with themselves – they didn’t know who to visit,’ said Mrs Williams, from Ellesmere Port, Cheshire.

‘On the day of our operation, the consultant at the hospital couldn’t believe that we had been diagnosed on the same day and would be undergoing our operation on the same day.

‘She said that in 40 years in the NHS she had never seen anything like it before.’

Ms Leach, 65, who has retired from running a carpet fitting business, and who lives in Hoole, Chester, underwent a mastectomy.

Mrs Williams had a tumour removed from her right breast, tissue from her left, and had both breasts reduced.

The mother and daughter also underwent surgery on the same day, at the same hospital

The mother and daughter also underwent surgery on the same day, at the same hospital

The beauty consultant, said: ‘The thing about it is that breast cancer can happen to any woman, at any time. It is just a case of bad luck that we were both diagnosed at the same time.'

The married mother-of-four, added: ‘It was a really hard period to go through but we have a wonderful family who supported us all the way through it, and continue to be there for us.

‘The chemotherapy was really, really severe and there were some really dark days when I thought I just couldn’t carry on going.

‘Having a wonderful family and husband around me, as well as the support given by Macmillan, helped me keep going and now, thankfully, I am starting to get back to some sort of normality.

‘I have gone back to work recently, which I have loved and everyone has been great, but I think that I might like to try a different career path and work with those affected by cancer.

'It has really had a profound effect on both me and my mum.’

Mother and daughter were both treated at the Countess of Chester Hospital

Mother and daughter were both treated at the Countess of Chester Hospital

Now, having finished their course of chemotherapy, the pair are hosting a charity event to raise funds for Macmillan Cancer Care.

About 48,000 women in Britain are diagnosed with breast cancer every year.

Women in the UK have a one in eight chance of developing the cancer during their lifetime.

Eight out of ten women who are diagnosed with the cancer are over 50, but younger women, and men, can develop it as well.

Only five to ten per cent of breast cancers are thought to be linked to an inherited breast cancer gene.

The genes most commonly linked to an increased risk of the cancer in families are BRCA1 and BRCA2.

A woman who has a mother or sister with the disease has double the risk of developing it herself.

Women who carry the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene have a 45 to 65 per cent chance of developing the disease by the age of 70.

Could Tetris spell the end of the eye patch? Scientists use computer game to treat lazy eye

Could Tetris spell the end of the eye patch Scientists use computer game to treat lazy eye
Tetris can be used to train both eyes to work togetherCurrently people with lazy eye wear eye patch to force the weaker eye to work but its not effective in adultsTetris technique resulted in 'dramatic' improvement

By
Emma Innes

PUBLISHED:

08:02 GMT, 25 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

08:02 GMT, 25 April 2013

Tetris could spell the end of the eye patch for people with lazy eye

Tetris could spell the end of the eye patch for people with lazy eye

The computer game Tetris could spell the end of the eye patch for people with lazy eye.

Researchers have found a way of using the game to treat adult amblyopia by training both eyes to work together.

The breakthrough provides direct evidence that forcing both eyes to co-operate increases the level of plasticity in the brain and allows the amblyopic brain to relearn.

Amblyopia is the most common cause of visual impairment in childhood, affecting up to three in 100 people.

It occurs when the vision in one eye does not develop properly.

This means the person can see less clearly from the underdeveloped eye meaning they rely heavily on their other eye.

If untreated, it can lead to permanent loss of vision in the affected eye.

Previous treatments for the disorder, which have focused largely on covering the stronger eye in order to force the weaker eye to work, have proved only partially successful in children and have been ineffective in adults.

Study leader Doctor Robert Hess, Director of the Research Department of Ophthalmology at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, said: ‘The key to improving vision for adults, who currently have no other treatment options, was to set up conditions that would enable the two eyes to cooperate for the first time in a given task.’

The researchers examined the potential of treating amblyopic adults using Tetris, which involves connecting different shaped blocks as they fall to the ground.

Dr Hess said: ‘Using head-mounted video goggles we were able to display the game dichoptically, where one eye was allowed to see only the falling objects, and the other eye was allowed to see only the ground plane objects.

‘Forcing the eyes to work together, we believed, would improve vision in the lazy eye.’

The researchers tested a sample of 18 adults with amblyopia.

Amblyopia is the most common cause of visual impairment in childhood, affecting up to three in 100 people

Amblyopia is the most common cause of visual impairment in childhood, affecting up to three in 100 people

Nine participants played the game with the weaker eye, while the stronger eye was patched.

The other nine played the same game dichoptically, where each eye was allowed to view a separate part of the game.

After two weeks, the group playing the dichoptic game showed a ‘dramatic’ improvement in the vision of the weaker eye as well as in 3D depth perception.

When the patching-wearing group, who had shown only a moderate improvement, was switched to the new dichoptic training, the vision of this group also improved dramatically.

Now the suitability of the treatment in children will be assessed later this year in a clinical trial.

The research was published in the journal Current Biology.

Schools should exclude children who have not had MMR jab, says leading scientist

Schools should exclude children who have not had MMR jab, says leading scientistDr Craig Venter, a leading biologist, said unvaccinated children are a 'hazard to society'Department of Health said that such measures were unnecessary and risked alienating parents

By
Rachel Reilly

PUBLISHED:

08:44 GMT, 25 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

09:58 GMT, 25 April 2013

Schools should have the right to refuse access to pupils who have not had the MMR jab, a leading scientist has said.

Biologist Dr Craig Venter said that vaccinations should be made compulsory for children who wish to attend school and benefit from the NHS.

His statement comes after health officials have launched a new programme to help stem the measles outbreak in South Wales and stop it spreading more widely across the UK.

Immunise: Dr Craig Venter says children should not be allowed to attend school unless they have had the MMR jab

Immunise: Dr Craig Venter says children should not be allowed to attend school unless they have had the MMR jab

Dr Venter was the first scientist to successfully sequence the human genome as well as create a cell with an artificial genome.

‘People think they’re making individual decisions for themselves and their family not to get vaccinated,’ Dr Venter told The Times. ‘It’s not just an individual choice, you’re a hazard to society.’

He said that unvaccinated individuals are putting the population at risk.

The number of people infected with the virus in Swansea in now approaching 900.

The city has been left especially vulnerable to measles since the 90s, when a local newspaper campaigned against the MMR vaccine.

There are now concerns the outbreak could spread to London.

David Salisbury, director of immunisation at the Department of Health said: ‘What happened and continues
to happen in Swansea could happen anywhere in England.

‘I worry about London. It’s a fast
moving group of people, with new families coming in and families moving
out. It is harder to track immunisation status.
Historically there is also a legacy of poorer immunisation.'

Health officials announced today that at least a million children and
teenagers are to be vaccinated against measles in an attempt to stop
expected outbreaks in England.

Some
will never have had a jab, while others have only had the first of two
doses of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine.

Dr Venter's comments came after the government's decision to launch a 20million vaccination campaign across the country

Dr Venter's comments came after the government's decision to launch a 20million vaccination scheme across the country

Many of those affected are teenagers
who missed out on vaccination in the late 1990s and early 2000s when
parents were concerned about a link between MMR and autism that has
since been discredited.

Dr Venter also warned that low vaccination rates raised the prospect of circulating infections mutating into new forms. This could lead to current vaccines no longer offering protection, and putting the entire population at risk.

‘Strains that could not develop in a population that was vaccinated could mutate and affect everybody whether they have been vaccinated or not,” he added.

The Department of Health said increased vaccine level were proof that Dr Venter’s proposal was unnecessary, arguing that it risked alienating parents.

However Dr Venter’s call for a mandatory vaccination was supported by Rino Rappuoli, global head of vaccines research at Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics.

The two scientists were speaking yesterday at a House of Commons event to raise the profile of the first approved vaccine for Meningitis B, which they have jointly developed.

One million children and teenagers to get measles jab amid fears of English outbreaks

One million children and teenagers to get measles jab amid fears of English outbreaks
The 20million campaign follows a big rise in cases in South WalesMany affected missed out on vaccination in late 1990s and early 2000s587 confirmed measles cases in England in first three months of 2013That's more than three times the 168 cases in
the same period of 2012

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Vaccinations: Figures show there were 587 confirmed measles cases in England in the first three months of this year, more than three times the 168 cases in the same period of 2012

Figures from Public Health England
(PHE) show there were 587 confirmed measles cases in England in the
first three months of this year, more than three times the 168 cases in
the same period of 2012. The highest number of cases is among ten to
16-year-olds.

Experts predict England’s total this year will exceed the 1,920 cases confirmed in 2012 unless action is taken.

Professor David Salisbury, director of
immunisation at the Department of Health, said: ‘The situation in
Swansea, I believe, is a wake-up call for parents – for parents who for
whatever reason, quite a few years ago, chose not to vaccinate their
children and for whom these days vaccines aren’t really things that they
think about very much.’

He added: ‘You have to prevent measles
and that means we need to get ahead before we have got large numbers of
cases and large outbreaks occurring in England.’

He said the country faced a potential
national health emergency without a catch-up campaign that will be
carried out by GPs, schools and community programmes until September.

Around one third of a million ten to 16-year-olds who are not already vaccinated will be the ‘first priority’.

A further third of a million children
in this age group need at least one more MMR jab to give them full
protection, along with a similar number above and below this age range.

Protection: The 20million campaign follows a big rise in cases in south Wales, where public health officials have been running clinics to increase protection rates (file picture)

Protection: The 20million campaign follows a big rise in cases in south Wales, where public health officials have been running clinics to increase protection rates (file picture)

Dr Mary Ramsay, PHE head of
immunisation, said there was particular concern about potential measles
outbreaks in London, the South and East of England where MMR vaccination
rates were historically lower than in the North.

She said older children not vaccinated
as toddlers could ‘spread infection very effectively’, adding: ‘Measles
is not a mild illness. It is very unpleasant and can lead to serious
complications … with more than 100 children in England being
hospitalised so far this year.’

Speaking this morning on BBC Radio 4's Today programme, she added that parents often think once their child is over the age of five they are not at risk from measles.

‘We are worried – this is not an epidemic in England yet as the cases we have had have been clustered, but there is the potential for outbreaks to happen in other areas as there are people who have not been vaccinated. We really want to get ahead of that and stop this happening across England.

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg today confirmed that his three sons Antonio, Alberto and Miguel have all had the MMR jab

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg today confirmed that his three sons Antonio, Alberto and Miguel have all had the MMR jab

‘We have already done several things over the years (to get children vaccinated) and we ran a similar campaign in 2008. But the problem is people forget that their children are still at risk of measles over the age of five.

‘Although people are being reminded, they don’t realise that the measles risk doesn’t stop.’

She added that most children born today are vaccinated before they start school but the problem is a minority who were not immunised a decade ago at the height of the MMR scare.

‘We are trying to get at the very small proportion that are left who haven’t had the injection and they are quite difficult to find. We are going to be asking GPS to go through their records and contact parents both through the general practice and also through schools.’

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg today confirmed that his three sons Antonio, Alberto and Miguel have all had the MMR jab, and said that he did not feel the need to 'cross his fingers' as he decided to have them vaccinated.

Speaking on his Call Clegg phone-in show on LBC 97.3 radio, the Liberal Democrat leader said: 'The overwhelming advice is that this is the right thing to do to protect the health of your child.

'I think you have to have trust in the people who look at this. They have no axe to grind, they just want to do the right thing and come up with the right science.

'They have said very categorically that the concern about a link between MMR and other conditions is just not proven, and they say really explicitly that it is really bad for your children's health if you don't take this action.

'I really would urge parents, whatever your misgivings, do what people who know about this most say is right for your children – get that course of jabs done.'

Olivia Munn chows down on fries as she and Dev Patel shoot The Newsroom in Central Park

It's hungry work! Olivia Munn chows down on fries as she and Dev Patel shoot The Newsroom in Central Park

By
Daily Mail Reporter

PUBLISHED:

18:27 GMT, 24 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

06:51 GMT, 25 April 2013

It seems that working on a hit TV show is hungry work and Olivia Munn was seen chowing down on fries as she shot scenes for The Newsroom in New York on Wednesday.

The 32-year-old actress was seen munching on the snack and slurping from a cup as she and Dev Patel sat in Madison Square Gardens together.

Olivia, who plays Sloan Sabbith on the show, was dressed in a khaki jacket and a pair of tight jeans for the scene.

Hungry work: Olivia Munn was seen chowing down on some fries as she and Dev Patel shot scenes for The Newsroom in New York

Hungry work: Olivia Munn was seen chowing down on some fries as she and Dev Patel shot scenes for The Newsroom in New York

Dev was seen chatting on a mobile phone and looked worried during the lunch scene.

It seems that Olivia needed a reminder of her lines and was seen looking at a script as the group took a break from filming.

The British star plays Neal Sampat on the show, a blogger who writes copy for the lead character Will McAvoy's website.

Slim and slender: Olivia wore a khaki jacket and tight dark jeans to shoot the scenes in Central Park

Slim and slender: Olivia wore a khaki jacket and tight dark jeans to shoot the scenes in Central Park

Breaking news The British actor was seen chatting on a phone during the lunch scene

Breaking news The British actor was seen chatting on a phone during the lunch scene

The second series of the show is set to
air later this year and fans will no doubt be excited about the
programme's return to the small screen.

The synopsis for the second series is that the staff of ‘News Night’ chases a mysterious tip, which leads to a story that ultimately spins out of control, according to Hyperable.com.

Dev was hard at work just a day after celebrating his 23rd birthday on Tuesday.

Olivia didn't celebrate with her co-star, she was busy attending the Time 100 gala.

Captivated in conversation: The pair, who play colleagues on the show, were seen chatting to another actor during the scene

Captivated in conversation: The pair, who play colleagues on the show, were seen chatting to another actor during the scene

Sharing a giggle: Olivia seemed amused by something Dev told her

Sharing a giggle: Olivia seemed amused by something Dev told her

The actress wowed at the event in a stunning bright yellow lace gown by Michael Kors and the hue complemented her complexion.

Olivia joined a whole host of familiar faces at the event including Amy Poehler, Jimmy Fallon and Lena Dunha.

Forgetful Olivia was seen checking a script as the pair took a break from filming

Forgetful Olivia was seen checking a script as the pair took a break from filming

Return to screens: The hit show is set to air later this summer

Return to screens: The hit show is set to air later this summer

Kelly Osbourne strolls hand-in-hand with her fiancé Matthew Mosshart as she opens up about staying slim

So content with life: Kelly Osbourne strolls hand-in-hand with her fiancé Matthew Mosshart as she opens up about staying slim

By
Sarah Fitzmaurice

PUBLISHED:

20:42 GMT, 24 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

06:50 GMT, 25 April 2013

Her parents might be going through a troubled time but life is looking peachy for Kelly Osbourne.

The 28-year-old TV presenter couldn't stop smiling as she took a stroll with her fiancé Matthew Mosshart in New York on Thursday morning.

The couple couldn't stop laughing as they made their way around the Lower East side.

She looks so happy! Kelly Osbourne was seen hand-in-hand with her fiancé Matthew Mosshart as the couple strolled around New York

She looks so happy! Kelly Osbourne was seen hand-in-hand with her fiancé Matthew Mosshart as the couple strolled around New York

Kelly was dressed in a pair of leggings, a loose fitting T-shirt and a leather biker jacket.

She had her purple hair pulled back into a ponytail secured with a stud-embellished headband.

Her man sported a casual look in a
pair of maroon trousers, a white T-shirt and a grey hooded jumper, which
he had pulled over his head.

While the love life seems to be right on track, Kelly recently spoke out about accepting her shape.

Kelly has revealed maintaining her
svelte figure after her dramatic five stone weight-loss is thanks to
'committing to a life change'.

Was it something he said: Kelly was seen giggling and showed off her trim shape in a pair of black leggings, a white T-shirt and a black leather jacket

Was it something he said: Kelly was seen giggling and showed off her trim shape in a pair of black leggings, a white T-shirt and a black leather jacket

A lifestyle change: The TV presenter has recently opened up about her new fitness regime and how she stays slim

A lifestyle change: The TV presenter has recently opened up about her new fitness regime and how she stays slim

The 28-year-old said she would never
have kept the weight off if she had tried to stick to a strict diet and
constantly denied herself food such as pizza.

'I learnt how to work out right and
eat right, it’s one of those things that you just have to commit to a
life change rather than being on a diet. Because a diet doesn’t work,'
she told the Huffington Post.

While everything seems to be slotting into place in Kelly's life her parents are going through a difficult time.

Cake time: Earlier in the day Kelly tweeted a snap of her niece Pearl enjoying some birthday cake

Cake time: Earlier in the day Kelly tweeted a snap of her niece Pearl enjoying some birthday cake

Her mother Sharon recently spoke about Ozzy's recent relapse on The Talk.

The 60-year-old said: 'I am devastated right now,' she said. 'It's a disease that not only hurts the person who has the disease, but it hurts the family. It hurts people who love you.'

I never knew he was using prescription drugs. I knew he was drinking occasionally, but didn't realise the extent.'

Diabetes danger in just ONE sugary drink a day: Chance of developing Type 2 increases by a fifth

Diabetes danger in just ONE sugary drink a day: Chance of developing Type 2 increases by a fifth

By
Jenny Hope

PUBLISHED:

21:58 GMT, 24 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

07:08 GMT, 25 April 2013

The risk of diabetes rose by as much as 22 per cent for every can of drink consumed per day

The risk of diabetes rose by as much as 22 per cent for every can of drink consumed per day

Drinking one can of soft drink a day can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes by a fifth, scientists warn.

A major study found the risk rose by as much as 22 per cent for every 12oz serving of sugar-sweetened drink – a typical can – consumed per day.

Soft drinks have previously been linked with weight gain and obesity – a well-known trigger for type 2 diabetes – but researchers say the effect goes beyond body weight and may be caused by an increase in insulin resistance.

The study of almost 30,000 people living in eight European countries, including Britain, follows US research which made near-identical findings. Scientists at Imperial College London wanted to determine whether the link held good in Europe, where soft drinks are less popular than in America.

Professor Nick Wareham, of the Medical Research Council’s epidemiology unit, who oversaw the study, said it was more evidence that people should be cautious about the amount of sugary soft drink they consumed.

He said: ‘This finding adds to growing global literature suggesting that there is a link between consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, obesity and risk of development of type 2 diabetes.

‘This observation suggests that consumption of these beverages should be limited as part of an overall healthy diet.’

Researchers found that the risk of type 2 diabetes rose 22 per cent for people having one 12oz (336ml) serving of sugar-sweetened soft drink a day compared with those not having any. For those having two soft drinks, it rose a further 22 per cent over those having one drink.

The number of Britons diagnosed with diabetes hit three million this year for the first time – almost one in 20 of the population.

Type 2 diabetes is strongly linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle and an unhealthy diet.

It occurs when the body gradually loses
the ability to process blood sugar, leading to high levels which can
damage body organs and result in years of ill-health.

The latest study used data on
consumption of juices and nectars, sugar-sweetened soft drinks and
artificially sweetened soft drinks. It involved 12,403 people with type 2
diabetes and 16,154 without diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is linked to obesity, sedentary lifestyles and unhealthy diets

Type 2 diabetes is linked to obesity, sedentary lifestyles and unhealthy diets – there is a link between consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, obesity and risk of development of type 2 diabetes

The researchers, led by Dr Dora Romaguera, said a possible reason for the link could be the effect of sugar-sweetened drinks on insulin resistance.

Type 2 diabetes is frequently preceded by an increase in insulin resistance, where the body becomes insensitive to the effects of insulin resulting in high blood sugar levels.

Dr Romaguera said: ‘Given the increase in sweet beverage consumption in Europe, clear messages on the unhealthy effect of these drinks should be given to the population.’

Consumption of pure fruit juice and nectar drinks was not implicated in rising diabetes, although the study could not separate out the effect of 100 per cent pure juices from those with added sugars.

Dr Matthew Hobbs, of Diabetes UK, said: ‘The large number of people involved in this study means this finding is extremely unlikely to have happened by chance.’

Gavin Partington, of the British Soft Drinks Association, said: ‘It is well known that diabetes is the result of many different factors, including obesity and family history.

‘Soft drinks are safe to consume but, like all other food and drink, should be consumed in moderation.’ The study was published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.


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