Why only some people become addicted to drugs: Scans of cocaine users reveal the shape of your brain could be to blame

Why only some people become addicted to drugs: Scans of cocaine users reveal brain shape could be to blame Drug users who aren't dependent have an abnormally large frontal lobeThis section of the brain is implicated in self-controlThose who didn't become addicted had a low-boredom threshold By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 17:06 GMT, 18 January 2013 | UPDATED: 17:09 GMT, 18 January 2013 People who take cocaine over many years without becoming addicted have their brains to thank, a study has found.

Single test to detect three types of cancer in women which claim 7,000 lives a year

Single test to detect three types of cancer in women which claim 7,000 lives a yearNew test can detect cancer of the cervix, womb and ovaries During trials, it found 40% of ovarian tumours – known as 'the silent killer' This method had a 100% success rate in detecting endometrial cancer on the lining on the womb By Fiona Macrae PUBLISHED: 19:47 GMT, 9 January 2013 | UPDATED: 20:24 GMT, 9 January 2013 Breakthrough: The test – based on the existing smear test to detect cervical cancer – can also find ovarian and endometrial cancers (stock image) A major breakthrough in the battle against female cancer was signalled last night with the emergence of a single test to detect three different types of the disease.

Bowel cancer: Scientists develop rear-view mirror to spot disease

Scientists develop rear-view mirror to spot bowel cancer | UPDATED: 00:47 GMT, 11 December 2012 Scientists have developed a new device that works like a ‘rear-view mirror’ for the surgeon during bowel examinations, helping to detect 25 per cent more abnormalities Bowel cancer is Britain’s third most common cancer, with 40,000 new diagnoses a year.

Stressed expectant mothers "60% more likely" to have babies with health problems

Stressed expectant mothers '60% more likely' to have babies with health problems Stress during pregnancy leaves a baby more at risk of breathing difficulties and being placed on a ventilator for the first half hour of its life | UPDATED: 10:15 GMT, 3 July 2012 Expectant mothers who suffer from stress are 60 per cent more likely to have babies with health problems, according to a study.

Pilates can make your bad back worse: Experts agree it can help reduce pain and improve posture, but there are also hidden dangers

How pilates can make your bad back worse: It can help reduce pain and improve posture, but as one woman's story shows, there are hidden dangers | UPDATED: 01:32 GMT, 19 June 2012 Sophie Barnes slipped a disc while doing pilates Like thousands of women, Sophie Barnes decided to do Pilates to get back into shape after giving birth.

Claire Squires"s death: Why are heart flutters on the rise? asks DR ELLIE CANNON

Why are heart flutters on the rise | UPDATED: 21:00 GMT, 5 May 2012 Claire Squires, 30, died just before the finish at this year's London Marathon The death of Claire Squires just before the finish at this year’s London Marathon rightly struck a chord.

Patients may dread colonoscopies, but study finds they halve risk of colon cancer death

Patients may dread having a colonoscopy, but study finds they halve risk of colon cancer death Treated patients had 53% lower risk of dying from colon cancer than would be expected in a similar group in the general populationProcedure involves inserting a tiny camera on a tube through the anus into the large intestine It is a procedure that is both uncomfortable and embarrassing, but a new study has found patients don't endure colonoscopies in vain.

Starting to slouch? It may be a sign your spine"s crumbling

Starting to slouch It may be a sign your spine's crumbling Ian Headrick is now three inches taller, having 'grown' from 5ft 8in to 5ft 11in One of Ian Headrick’s most distinctive childhood memories is constantly being told by his parents not to slouch.

Tiny parachute that could help thousands of heart attack victims

Tiny parachute that could help thousands of heart attack victims A device that looks like a tiny parachute could save thousands of heart attack patients from heart failure. The parachute, which is ‘deployed’ only once it is inside the heart, works by sealing off an area of muscle damaged during a heart attack, where a blood clot starves the organ of oxygen.