Drivers who sneeze behind the wheel cause 2,500 accidents a WEEK – now experts say they should stay off the roads

Drivers who sneeze behind the wheel cause 2,500 accidents a WEEK – now experts say they should stay off the roads Motorists can travel 50ft blind when sneezingDrivers with severe colds 'should stay off the roads' Study suggests those with the sniffles should leave four extra car lengths for slower reaction times digg] By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 17:00 GMT, 14 February 2013 | UPDATED: 18:14 GMT, 14 February 2013 Getting behind the wheel when bunged up with a cold is far more dangerous than drivers realise, researchers say.

The ultra-realistic prosthetics helping rebuild patients" lives after illness or accidents

Suits you, sir: The ultra-realistic prosthetics helping rebuild patients' lives after illness or accidents Experts at the Royal Truro Hospital make 9,000 fake body parts a yearRecipients include facial trauma victims injured after fires, cancers and throat operationsDoctors sculpt each feature in wax and mould into latex noses, teeth or earsThen make sure each one is a perfect match for the patient's skin tone By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 13:16 GMT, 31 January 2013 | UPDATED: 13:34 GMT, 31 January 2013 These bizarrre images of eyes, ears and noses look like a film make-up department – but are a behind-the-scenes peek at a hospital prosthetic unit.

Unsupervised children having more accidents because parents are too busy playing on their smartphones

Playground children having more accidents because parents are too busy playing on their smartphones Number of children admitted to hospital after playground falls has risen by a third in five yearsExperts blame the sharp rise on parents being distracted by text messages and emails Children also more inclined to take risks or misbehave when they know their parents&#8217; attention is diverted <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 17:33 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/23/article-2237034-1263F290000005DC-293_233x423.jpg" width="233" height="423" alt="Children are having more accidents in playgrounds because their parents are too busy checking their smartphones to look after them properly (picture posed by model)" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Children are having more accidents in playgrounds because their parents are too busy checking their smartphones to look after them properly (picture posed by model)</p> <p>Children are having more accidents because their parents are too busy checking their mobile phones to supervise them properly, researchers warn.</p><p>They blame a sharp rise in playground falls and mishaps in the home on their mothers or fathers being distracted by text messages and emails.<br></p><p>The number of children being admitted to hospital having fallen from playground equipment has risen by a third in the last five years, according to NHS data.</p><p>Parenting experts and doctors specialising in emergency departments believe the rise is partly fuelled by the growing use of smartphones and BlackBerries.</p><p>They also point out children are more inclined to take risks or misbehave when they know their parents&#8217; attention is diverted.</p><p>Figures from the NHS show that last year some 9,564 children were admitted to hospital having fallen from playground equipment, up from 7,232 in 2006/7.</p> <p>Researchers point out that this rise coincided with the increasing availability of BlackBerrys and smartphones, such as Apple&#8217;s iPhone, which went on the market five years ago.

These REALLY take the cake! Hilariously Unfortunate and half-baked dessert designs

These REALLY take the cake! Hilariously unfortunate and half-baked dessert designs. They may be covered in icing, sprinkles, candy and good intentions, but there”s just something about these cakes that”s gone terribly wrong that no amount of chocolate can fix.

How giving birth could leave some women with symptoms as traumatic as those from a terrorist attack

How giving birth could leave one in three new mothers with same symptoms as victims of terrorist attacks Symptoms include flashbacks and a rapid heart beat when reliving the event | UPDATED: 12:42 GMT, 9 August 2012 Labour: Symptoms include flashbacks and denial of the traumatic experience Women are not exaggerating when they say they go through hell when giving birth – one in three new mothers will develop Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, a new study claims.

You ARE more likely to die if taken to hospital at weekend: Study confirms that NHS care is worse on a Saturday and Sunday

You ARE more likely to die if taken to hospital at weekend: Study confirms that NHS care is worse on a Saturday and SundayChances of recovery are jeopardised because senior doctors are absent and tests are not always availableStudy finds that Sunday patients are 16 per cent more likely to die than those admitted on a WednesdayHealth Secretary Andrew Lansley says the findings are 'unacceptable' Patients admitted to hospitals at weekends are far more likely to die than those taken there on weekdays, a major study has confirmed.

Can female sex hormones beat brain damage? Doctors believe progesterone may have protective effect

Can female sex hormones beat brain damage Doctors believe progesterone may have protective effect Treating brain injuries costs the NHS 1.2 billion a year A major new trial has begun in the UK using the sex hormone progesterone to treat brain injuries. Doctors believe the chemical — usually thought of as a female hormone — may have a protective effect on the brain, reducing swelling and improving mental recovery. Five hospitals are now testing the new approach on patients with traumatic brain injuries caused by road accidents, sports injuries, falls and assaults.

Britain"s first hand transplant to be performed in NHS hospital next year

Britain”s first hand transplant to be performed in NHS hospital next year Surgeons are to carry out Britain’s first hand transplant, giving hope to those who have suffered terrible injuries. It involves plastic surgeons carefully stitching on one from a donor, and a new NHS unit will be set up for the procedure. Professor Simon Kay, who is spearheading the facility at Leeds Teaching Hospital, said the first procedure would be carried out next year and five or six people had already come forward as potential recipients