Man stops shaking for first time in 15 years after brain zapped with ultrasound in pioneering surgery-free treatment

Man's hands stop shaking for first time in 15 years after doctors zap his brain with pioneering ultrasound treatment Doctors used MRI scans to find rogue brain cells causing the tremorUltrasound killed cells by heating them Patient was awake and aware throughout the five-hour procedure and didn't need anaestheticExperts say it could help patients with other conditions such as Parkinson's or brain tumours | UPDATED: 16:45 GMT, 19 December 2012 A man whose hands shook so violently he struggled to eat and drink has undergone a pioneering treatment to ease his tremor.

Sex addiction: A real disorder, say the scientists who"ve defined what the symptoms are

Sex addiction IS a real disorder, say the scientists who've defined what the symptoms are May affect people whose sexual activities are 'excessive and interfere with daily life'Or those who have experienced 'recurrent and intense sexual fantasies and urges' for at least six months | UPDATED: 09:45 GMT, 12 October 2012 Russell Brand admitted in his autobiography that sex addiction nearly ruined his career It has traditionally been written off as an 'excuse' for philandering celebrities, but a new study suggests that sex addiction is a real disorder.

Exercise can help cancer sufferers beat the disease and stop it returning

Exercise can help cancer sufferers beat the disease and stop it returning | UPDATED: 18:35 GMT, 29 August 2012 Health benefit: Regular exercise can cut the risk of cancer patients relapsing by 50 per cent Cancer patients can cut the risk of recurrence by half if they exercise, a number of studies have found.

Undearm implant that jump-starts an irregular heart

Undearm implant that jump-starts an irregular heart | UPDATED: 01:05 GMT, 15 May 2012 Tragedy: Runner Claire Squires died during last month's London Marathon A million Britons suffer from an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia, and every year 70,000 die as a result.

Being motivated and having a goal in life "can stave off effects of Alzheimer"s"

Being motivated and having a goal in life 'can stave off effects of Alzheimer's' Positive effects of having a meaningful life found to counteract effects of damage to brainMost older people have plaques on brain but not all develop Alzheimer's, indicating that having purpose could play a role in development of the disease | UPDATED: 21:23 GMT, 7 May 2012 Researchers have found that a greater sense of purpose in life may help stave off the effects of Alzheimer’s.

Dementia cases "to double by 2030" says World Health Organisation

Dementia cases 'to double by 2030' says World Health Organisation A new case of dementia is diagnosed every four secondsLess than half of dementia cases are routinely recognised even in high-income countries By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 12:01 GMT, 11 April 2012 | UPDATED: 12:10 GMT, 11 April 2012 Author Sir Terry Pratchett, is a well-known sufferer of Alzheimer's Disease and is campaigning for better treatment and care The number of people suffering dementia around the globe is expected to nearly double to 65.7million sufferers by 2030, the World Health Organisation has warned.

Why televisions should be banned from toddlers bedrooms to help tackle obesity

Why televisions should be banned from toddlers' bedrooms to help tackle obesityMore than a fifth are overweight or obese by the time they start school, according to official figuresWatching television increases risk of children becoming dangerously overweight | UPDATED: 09:39 GMT, 6 April 2012 Parents should remove televisions from children’s bedrooms to combat record rates of obesity in youngsters, experts have warned.

Running marathons "could permanently damage the heart"

Running marathons “could permanently damage the heart”High-endurance activities can scar right ventricleIncreased risk of reduced performance – a cardiac “over-training” syndrome – or arrhythmia Marathon runners such as Paula Radcliffe could be at risk of permanent heart damage Running marathons could cause permanent heart damage, say scientists. A study found that high-endurance activities can lead to scarring of the right ventricle, increasing the risk of health complications