Premature twins died after being given 10 times too much morphine, nursing tribunal hears

Premature twins died after being given 10 times too much morphine, nursing tribunal hears Alfie and Harry McQuillan were born at 27 weeks in October 2010Were in a 'good condition' despite being born so early, inquest heardPrescribed morphine to stabilise them but instead given 'excessive dose'Died at scandal-hit Stafford Hospital two days later Nurse in charge, Joanne Thompson, now facing disciplinary hearingAccused of letting less senior member of staff administer wrong dose heard.

Exhausted junior doctors working 100 hours a week are putting patients" lives at risk

Exhausted junior doctors working 100 hours a week are putting patients' lives at risk Some of the 55,000 junior doctors are working double the legal limit of 48 hours a week12 and 13 hour shifts are not usual, warn researchersMany hospitals are relying on trainee doctors to provide care without adequate supervision By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 16:28 GMT, 14 February 2013 | UPDATED: 16:32 GMT, 14 February 2013 Many trainee doctors are 'tired and stressed' because of shift patterns which flout European laws on working hours Patients are being put at risk as exhausted junior doctors work for 100 hours a week, a new report suggests.

A Valentine"s dinner to add bedtime spice

A Valentine's dinner to add bedtime spiceYour food choice can affect your Valentine's outcomeGo for chilli, chocolate and avocado By Rachel Reilly PUBLISHED: 22:00 GMT, 9 February 2013 | UPDATED: 22:35 GMT, 9 February 2013 Heating it up: Chilli is the key to a steamy Valentine's Day Foods to get you in the mood have long been on the menu for lovers, but is there really any link between what you eat and how things progress in the bedroom We ask the experts if an aphrodisiac will ensure a romantic Valentine’s Day.

Sleeping for an extra hour a night "helps beat pain"

Sleeping for an extra hour a night 'helps beat pain'Sleeping ten hours instead of eight is more effective than codeine medicine | UPDATED: 00:15 GMT, 1 December 2012 Sleeping for an hour or more extra a night can dramatically improve an individual’s alertness and reduce their sensitivity to pain, say scientists.

Mother of boy who died from meningitis wins seven-year battle to bring consultant before GMC

Mother who lost son to meningitis wins SEVEN year battle to bring consultant who refused to prescribe antibiotics before GMC A mother of a boy who died from meningitis has won a seven year battle to bring a consultant before the General Medical Council.

90% of hospitals fail to check on nurses" English

90% of hospitals fail to check on nurses' English before letting them work on wardsLanguage problems only come to light when patients' requests are not understood Fewer than one in ten hospitals check whether nurses from Europe can adequately speak English before letting them work on wards, it has emerged. Language problems often only come to light when patients find that their requests for more pain relief or different food are not understood, according to an NHS watchdog. Many hospital chiefs are totally unaware that due to strict anti-discrimination rules imposed by Brussels, it is illegal for the Nursing and Midwifery Council regulator to check the English language skills of nurses trained in EU countries.

Food in Scotland should be laced with vitamin D to stave off MS, experts say

Food in Scotland should be laced with vitamin D to stave off MS, experts sayResidents do not get enough UBV rays from the sun on the skinMany do not eat enough vitamin D-rich food Scotland”s food supply should be laced with vitamin D in a bid to cut the high rate of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the sun-deprived region, experts have said.

Our fatter children need more penicillin because doses were worked out for a thinner generation

Why fatter children need more penicillin: Doses were worked out for a thinner generation Growing problem: Children are now up to 20 per cent heavier than when guidelines on penicillin doses were worked out The obesity epidemic in children could be cutting the effectiveness of penicillin treatment – because the doses were worked out for a slimmer generation. Guidelines have remained unchanged for almost 50 years, but children are now up to 20 per cent heavier