Drinking too much? Head to the gym: Exercise can repair damage to the brain caused by alcohol

Drinking too much Head to the gym: Exercise can repair damage to the brain caused by alcohol Aerobic exercise such as jogging may alleviate some of the white-matter damage caused by heavy drinkingExercise can slow cognitive decline related with age By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 20:04 GMT, 16 April 2013 | UPDATED: 20:04 GMT, 16 April 2013 Working out can help former heavy drinkers limit the damage alcohol has done to their brain.

Feeling peckish? SKIPPING can banish your hunger pangs by making you feel full up

Feeling peckish How skipping can banish hunger by making you feel full upRapid up and down movement disturbs the gut and interferes with the release of hunger hormonesWeight-bearing exercise such as skipping is better at reducing appetite than other forms such as cycling By Pat Hagan PUBLISHED: 12:40 GMT, 20 February 2013 | UPDATED: 13:00 GMT, 20 February 2013 It brings a whole new meaning to the expression 'skipping meals'.

How exercise could stop money grabbers from craving cash

How exercise could stop you craving the finer things in life – and even wanting more money 'Natural high' associated with aerobic exercise, dampened the desire for a financial reward in the studyConfirms previous research that found a workout temporarily reduces junk food cravings | UPDATED: 17:26 GMT, 16 October 2012 Running gave all participants a 'natural high' which dampened their desire for other rewards Those who are never satisfied with their lot in life could find contentment by heading to the gym, say scientists.

More than half of over-50s admit they are overweight yet a third do no exercise at all, study finds

More than half of over-50s admit they are overweight yet a third do no exercise at all, study finds One in five adults said their weight is their biggest physical concern | UPDATED: 08:56 GMT, 23 July 2012 The most popular form of exercise was walking but one in seven said they enjoyed swimming Just over half of over 50s admit they are overweight yet one in three does not exercise at all, according to a new study.

Zona Plus: Can squeezing a ball help cut your blood pressure?

Can squeezing a computerised stress ball help cut your blood pressure Reducing the pressure A computerised stress ball could help to dilate and widen blood vessels A hand-held device that you squeeze for ten minutes a day could be a powerful new treatment for high blood pressure.