Being overweight and drinking alcohol TRIPLES the risk of deadly liver disease in women

Being overweight and drinking alcohol TRIPLES the risk of deadly liver disease in womenUK study confirms the dangerous link between drinking alcohol, being overweight and liver diseaseLiver disease is the fifth biggest killer in the UKNumber of people dying from condition has risen by 20 per cent over the past decade By Rachel Reilly PUBLISHED: 13:22 GMT, 26 April 2013 | UPDATED: 14:16 GMT, 26 April 2013 DM.has('shareLink', 'shareLinks', { 'id': '2315236', 'title': 'Being overweight and drinking alcohol TRIPLES the risk of deadly liver disease in women', 'url': 'http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2315236/Being-overweight-drinking-alcohol-TRIPLES-risk-deadly-liver-disease-women.html', 'eTwitterStatus': 'Being%20overweight%20and%20drinking%20alcohol%20TRIPLES%20the%20risk%20of%20deadly%20liver%20disease%20in%20women%20http://bit.ly/13ztrtg%20via%[email protected]' }); Being overweight and drinking alcohol dramatically increases the risk of developing fatty liver disease, according to a study presented at the International Liver Congress.

Drinking too much? Head to the gym: Exercise can repair damage to the brain caused by alcohol

Drinking too much Head to the gym: Exercise can repair damage to the brain caused by alcohol Aerobic exercise such as jogging may alleviate some of the white-matter damage caused by heavy drinkingExercise can slow cognitive decline related with age By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 20:04 GMT, 16 April 2013 | UPDATED: 20:04 GMT, 16 April 2013 Working out can help former heavy drinkers limit the damage alcohol has done to their brain.

Children as young as SEVEN are being admitted to hospital with alcohol addiction

Children as young as SEVEN are being admitted to hospital with alcohol addiction 380 children aged 10 or under treated for intoxication over four year period Figures are likely to be higher as 67 NHS trusts did not supply informationOne seven-year-old boy treated was deemed to be 'addicted' to alcoholAffected children often come from homes where alcohol already a problem .

NHS patients set to lose important controls over their private medical records

NHS patients set to lose important controls over their private medical recordsPatients will only be able to request that their data is not passed onInformation which could identify a patient could be used Campaigners say changes would amount to ditching patient confidentiality By Jack Doyle PUBLISHED: 00:28 GMT, 29 March 2013 | UPDATED: 07:40 GMT, 29 March 2013 Under proposed changes to the NHS constitution, patients will not have a veto over records being used for reasons unrelated to their own treatment NHS patients are set to lose important controls over their private medical records, the Daily Mail can reveal.

Soaring numbers of men with "drinkers nose" have unsightly thread veins removed to stop them looking like heavy boozers

Soaring numbers of men with 'drinkers nose' have unsightly thread veins removed to stop them looking like heavy boozers Thread veins around the nose can be caused by alcohol, but also smoking, sun exposure or rosaceaBut many men are worrying the veins give off the wrong impression of being 'boozy', say expertsMen now account for 40 per cent of procedures done, compared with just 5 per cent a decade ago By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 16:22 GMT, 1 March 2013 | UPDATED: 17:27 GMT, 1 March 2013 Doctors have reported a sharp rise in men requesting cosmetic treatment to reduce the effect of 'drinkers nose' – unsightly thread veins on the face often blamed on heavy drinking.

Don"t sniffle and drive: Driving with a cold can be as dangerous as drunk-driving

Don't sniffle and drive: Driving with a cold can be as dangerous as drunk-drivingGetting behind the wheel with a cold as bad as DUI Drivers with a heavy cold had slower reaction times than those who had up to four pints of beer By Roger Dobson PUBLISHED: 22:00 GMT, 23 February 2013 | UPDATED: 22:23 GMT, 23 February 2013 Driving with a heavy cold could be as dangerous as getting behind the wheel when you’re drunk.

Going vegetarian CAN reduce your risk of heart disease

Going vegetarian can reduce your risk of hospital treatment or death from heart disease by a THIRD People who cut meat and fish out of their diet were 32% less likely die or be hospitalised from heart diseaseVegetarians had lower blood pressures and cholesterol levels than meat eatersStudy, of 45,000 people, is largest of its kind By Jenny Hope PUBLISHED: 17:02 GMT, 30 January 2013 | UPDATED: 01:50 GMT, 31 January 2013 Becoming a vegetarian can reduce the risk of heart disease by a third, a major new study has found Vegetarians are a third less likely to need hospital treatment for heart disease or die from it, claim researchers.

Settling down with a couple of glasses of wine may only be good for you if you are slim

Settling down with a Christmas tipple may be good for your health – but only if you're slim Researchers have found moderate alcohol consumption may only be good for your heart if you are thin Australian scientists found it increases the risk of heart disease in those with a BMI of more than 27.5Original studies on the health benefits of alcohol may be outdated, they say | UPDATED: 11:26 GMT, 28 December 2012 The common assumption that a Christmas tipple is good for you may be wrong for most Britons The common assumption that a couple of glasses of wine are good for you may be wrong for most Britons, new research reveals.

Successful solo artists are twice as likely to die early as those in a band

Successful solo artists are twice as likely to die early as those in a bandResearchers claim soloists in Europe have a one in ten chance of premature deathSolo artists in America have a one in five chance of early death Group members fare better possibly because of support from their band mates | UPDATED: 12:45 GMT, 20 December 2012 British singer Amy Winehouse died in 2011 at the age of 27 Famous solo artists are twice as likely to die prematurely as stars in bands, according to researchers from the University of Liverpool.