Yet another good reason to tuck into that salad: Eating tomatoes could ward off depression

Yet another good reason to tuck into that salad: Eating tomatoes could ward off depression Eating tomatoes just a few times a week could halve a person’s chances of suffering the bluesContain antioxidant chemicals thought to protect against some diseasesBut other fruits and vegetables do not have the same benefits, the Chinese study found | UPDATED: 18:21 GMT, 4 December 2012 The humble tomato could play a crucial role in warding off depression, according to a new study.

Coffee cancer: Six cups a day cuts risk of both womb and prostate cancer

Six cups of coffee a day 'cuts risk of both womb and prostate cancer' | UPDATED: 12:54 GMT, 14 October 2012 The effects were seen regardless of whether regular or decaffeinated coffee was consumed Women who drink four to six cups of coffee a day are less likely to suffer from womb cancer, while men who drink this amount are less likely to suffer prostate cancer, according to a study using 117,000 volunteers.

How an apple a day could keep the cardiologist away – by lowering "bad" cholesterol

How an apple a day could keep the cardiologist away – by lowering 'bad' cholesterol Daily fruit lowered 'bad' cholesterol in the blood by 40% in middle-aged adults Apples were found to be more effective than a supplement containing an antioxidant found in the fruit PUBLISHED: 08:40 GMT, 3 October 2012 | UPDATED: 09:15 GMT, 3 October 2012 A new study suggests that eating apples each day could significantly improve the heart health of middle-aged adults in just one month.

Injection of nanoparticles could help save lives of victims of serious brain injury such as soldiers in battle

The brain injection that could help save lives of soldiers in battle and other victims of serious head injury Nanoparticles help stabilise bloodflow in the brain | UPDATED: 14:40 GMT, 24 August 2012 Victims of serious brain trauma could be saved by an injection of nanoparticles in the moments after injury, researchers have found.

"Natural" tomatoes are packed with more disease-fighting antioxidants, claim scientists

Does it pay to eat organic 'Natural' tomatoes are packed with more disease-fighting antioxidants, claim scientists Organic tomatoes produce higher levels of antioxidants in response to more stressful growing conditions | UPDATED: 12:21 GMT, 4 July 2012 Better for you Organic tomatoes do contain higher levels of disease-fighting chemicals, say scientists It's an argument that continues to exercise consumers and growers across the UK – organic produce may be good for the environment, but is it any better for your health A new study has found that when it comes to tomatoes at least, it really may pay off to fork out for the more expensive organic produce.

Antioxidant supplement "reduces irritability and repetitive behaviour in autistic children"

Antioxidant supplement 'reduces irritability and repetitive behaviour in autistic children' Scientists believe N-Acetylcysteine, or NAC, could be an effective therapy for autistic children | UPDATED: 16:11 GMT, 30 May 2012 An antioxidant supplement may be an effective therapy for autism, according to scientists.

Mediterranean diet can cut risk of developing age-related brain disorders, says new study

Mediterranean diet can cut risk of developing age-related brain disorders, says new study Eating healthy monounsaturated fats such as olive oil is known to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease Eating a Mediterranean-style diet helps keep the brain healthy, reducing age-related damage, say researchers.

Choose wisely this Christmas and count the calories in your festive treats

Count the calories in your festive treats It”s the nibbles that do for our waistlines at Christmas. To help you choose wisely, nutritionist Angela Dowden gives her verdicts on snacks in terms of calories. OLIVES Six calories, 0.6g fat per olive Olives satisfy a savoury craving with very little waistline impact – an average black olive has only around six calories