Live fast, die younger: Actors, singers and sportsman "die seven and a half years before other high achievers"

Live fast, die younger: Actors, singers and sportsman 'die seven and a half years before other high achievers'Analysis of successful people found those in the public eye died youngerElvis Presley, Jimi Hendrix and more did not realise their potential Young people considering chasing fame 'may face early death' By Fiona Macrae PUBLISHED: 00:16 GMT, 18 April 2013 | UPDATED: 00:31 GMT, 18 April 2013 Stars such as Kurt Cobain, formerly of hit grunge band Nirvana, are more likely to die young, according to new research Fame really does have a price, research shows.

Healthy men who have problems in the bedroom at risk of hidden heart disease

Healthy men who have problems in the bedroom are at risk of hidden heart disease Men with moderate erectile dysfunction were at 37 per cent higher risk of being admitted with heart diseaseErectile problems also boosted heart failure admission rates five-fold even for mild conditions By Daily Mail Reporter PUBLISHED: 22:03 GMT, 29 January 2013 | UPDATED: 08:22 GMT, 30 January 2013 Age-old dilemma: A third of men aged 60 to 69, and 60 per cent of those aged over 70 found to have erectile problems in study Healthy men who have trouble in the bedroom could be at risk of hidden heart disease, a study has found.

Settling down with a couple of glasses of wine may only be good for you if you are slim

Settling down with a Christmas tipple may be good for your health – but only if you're slim Researchers have found moderate alcohol consumption may only be good for your heart if you are thin Australian scientists found it increases the risk of heart disease in those with a BMI of more than 27.5Original studies on the health benefits of alcohol may be outdated, they say | UPDATED: 11:26 GMT, 28 December 2012 The common assumption that a Christmas tipple is good for you may be wrong for most Britons The common assumption that a couple of glasses of wine are good for you may be wrong for most Britons, new research reveals.

A new hay fever cure? Scientists trial Botox gel applied to the nose

Never mind wrinkles – a blob of Botox on your nose could banish hay fever, too Gel is applied to the nose and will penetrate the skinIt's hoped the toxin will block chemicals released by the body that cause annoying symptoms | UPDATED: 17:52 GMT, 9 October 2012 It has been used to treat a host of ailments from migraines to incontinence – and that's on top of it being the world's most famous wrinkle-buster.

David Glasheen: Australian castaway on island faces eviction

Real life Robinson Crusoe… but for how much longer Castaway living on Australian island for 20 years faces evictionDavid Glasheen has been living on Restoration Island off the Australian coast for almost 20 years after he lost 6.5 million on the stock market

World-first heart valve surgery is a "huge new step" in treatment of life-threatening narrowing arteries

Elderly patients have life-saving synthetic heart valves fitted in world-first surgery | UPDATED: 11:39 GMT, 19 June 2012 Doctors have conducted a world-first medical procedure in which heart valves are replaced without patients needing to undergo open heart surgery.

Could eating more cheese and milk make you brainier?

Fat lot of good: How eating more cheese and milk could make you brainier Those who regularly consumed dairy performed better on tests of mental ability than their peers Are you feeding your brain the right kind of fatty diet Dairy products such as cheese and milk are among the most reviled of foods, with many experts saying their links to heart disease and obesity mean we should shun them when possible.

Caroline Lovell: Home birth advocate dies delivering own baby daughter at home

Woman, 36, who campaigned for home births dies having baby daughter at her own house Caroline Lovell, 36, rushed to hospital after giving birth Death shocks midwives across Melbourne Coroner to conduct a full investigation Growing trend: In England, about 1 baby in 50 is born at home An Australian woman who was a strong supporter of home births has died tragically, delivering her own baby daughter at home.