Coffee could boost the effect of breast cancer drug tamoxifen

Two cups of coffee a day HALVES the risk of breast cancer returning by boosting the effect of medication With tamoxifen, coffee could halve the rate of breast cancer recurrence Tamoxifen works by stopping oestrogen reaching the tumour cells Oestrogen causes tumour cells to divide meaning that the tumour grows Researchers don't know why coffee makes the drug more effective By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 11:42 GMT, 26 April 2013 | UPDATED: 11:42 GMT, 26 April 2013 DM.has('shareLink', 'shareLinks', { 'id': '2315186', 'title': 'Two cups of coffee a day HALVES the risk of breast cancer returning by boosting the effect of medication', 'url': 'http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2315186/Coffee-boost-effect-breast-cancer-drug-tamoxifen.html', 'eTwitterStatus': 'Coffee%20could%20boost%20the%20effect%20of%20breast%20cancer%20drug%20tamoxifen%20http://bit.ly/15LVZUv%20via%[email protected]' }); Drinking two cups of coffee a day could stop breast cancer recurring in recovering patients, new research has revealed.

The mother and daughter who were diagnosed with breast cancer on the same day

The mother and daughter who were diagnosed with breast cancer on the SAME DAY Karen Williams and Diane Leach also had surgery on the same dayWere both diagnosed in February last year and are now recovering Having a mother who had breast cancer doubles a woman's risk By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 10:57 GMT, 25 April 2013 | UPDATED: 14:02 GMT, 25 April 2013 Karen Williams and her mother, Diane Leach, were both diagnosed with breast cancer on the same day A mother and daughter are recovering after both were diagnosed with breast cancer on the same day.

Nipple tattooing: The rise of "Tittooing" for women desperate for perfect nipples

The rise of 'Tittooing': Women desperate for perfect nipples are having them TATTOOED onNot content with perfectly shaped breasts, women now want nipples tattooed to add colour and definitionProcedure was originally used for patients who'd had reconstructions after breast cancer surgery But medical experts warn that the procedure should only be carried out by a qualified medical tattooist By Rachel Reilly PUBLISHED: 14:41 GMT, 17 April 2013 | UPDATED: 14:47 GMT, 19 April 2013 First there were tattooed brows for striking eyes and then came vajazzles for sparkling nether regions.

Eating your greens could slash your chances of developing PMT

Tucking into a salad could slash a woman's chance of developing PMTEating foods high in non-heme iron could cut PMS risk by 40 per cent, according to American researchersThis could be because iron is involved in serotonin production and serotonin regulates mood Eating too much iron can be very harmful By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 13:10 GMT, 27 February 2013 | UPDATED: 13:22 GMT, 27 February 2013 Women who eat plenty of leafy green vegetables could cut their risk of pre-menstrual syndrome by up to 40 per cent, according to researchers.

Alcohol is "responsible for four per cent of cancer deaths" but doctors are failing to emphasise the risks, warn experts

Alcohol is 'responsible for 4% of cancer deaths' but doctors are failing to emphasise the risks, warn expertsStudy by Department of Medicine at Boston University Medical CentreFound that reducing alcohol intake reduces the risk of developing cancerResearchers found that alcohol resulted in around 20,000 U.S.

Unborn babies get taste for fruit and vegetables from their mothers

Unborn babies get taste for fruit and vegetables from their mothers Babies are more accepting of foods their mothers eat often while pregnantStudy indicates they get also get a taste for novel foods through breast milk The research was carried out by the Monell Centre in PhiladelphiaBabies are 'biologically hardwired' to like food containing salt and sugarStudy found that they are not attracted to bitter foods like green vegetables By Nick Mcdermott PUBLISHED: 15:06 GMT, 14 February 2013 | UPDATED: 23:52 GMT, 14 February 2013 Mothers can reduce the chances of having fussy eaters by eating plenty of vegetables during pregnancy The parental crusade to get children to eat fruit and vegetables should begin before birth, researchers said last night.

Don"t tell patients they"ll look better after cosmetic surgery: New guidelines that "manage expectations" are unveiled

Surgeons demand that medical professionals carry out cosmetic procedures Practitioners should not imply patients will 'look nicer' or feel 'better' Should instead use unambiguous language like 'bigger' or 'smaller' Patients should also have psychological screening before treatmentPlus 'Botox parties' should be banned, as staff often untrained figures released yesterday by the British Association of Plastic Surgeons revealed that women had: Breast enlargments: 9,854 Eyelid surgery 6,071 Face/neck lift 5,324 Breast reduction 4,217 Nose job 3,228 Tummy tuck 2,882 Fat transfer 2,641 Liposuction 2,638 (Figures for BAAPS surgeons only) 'With the demand for cosmetic surgery and non-surgical treatments rising year on year, it is crucial that the highest level of professionalism is maintained amongst practitioners.' The British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons said the new guidance was a 'step in the right direction' but called for more stringent recommendations on cosmetic surgery advertising.

Cancer will no longer be "a death sentence": DNA-based treatment to transform lives within 10 years

Cancer will no longer be 'a death sentence': DNA-based treatment to transform lives within 10 years, say scientists Scientists 'close to radical technique to develop personalised treatments'Want to sequence DNA of tumours in patients to deliver tailored treatmentCould help patients to carry on for a decade in relatively good healthHopes that cancer could become a chronic disease rather than a killer It would pave way for radical forms of diagnosis, surveillance and therapy By Ben Spencer PUBLISHED: 04:17 GMT, 29 January 2013 | UPDATED: 10:28 GMT, 29 January 2013 Cancer will become a manageable condition rather than a death sentence within a decade, experts boldly predicted yesterday.

Simple blood test that predicts if a woman"s breast cancer is likely to return

Simple blood test that predicts if a woman's breast cancer is likely to return Test detects genetic changes in DNA that could signal return of most common form of breast cancer Early warning could spare some women unnecessary treatment with gruelling anti-cancer drugs By Fiona Macrae PUBLISHED: 17:37 GMT, 18 January 2013 | UPDATED: 18:21 GMT, 18 January 2013 A simple blood test could predict if the most common form of breast cancer will come back after treatment, say scientists.