The vibrating belt that banishes back pain

The vibrating belt that banishes back pain and tells you to sit up straightLumbago or lower back pain affects 80% of peopleNew Lumbia works to stop sufferers slouching Hoped it will be available across Europe by in 2014 By Rachel Reilly PUBLISHED: 14:52 GMT, 24 April 2013 | UPDATED: 19:01 GMT, 24 April 2013 A vibrating belt could help eliminate lumbago or lower back pain The Lumbia belt aims to remedy lumbago and, in particular, to prevent the need for surgery.

Postponing pregnancy slashes risk of most deadly form of breast cancer

Postponing pregnancy slashes risk of most deadly form of breast cancer Women who had their first child at least 15 years after their first period saw cancer risk drop by 60% However, breast feeding also found to have protective effect against the condition | UPDATED: 17:54 GMT, 13 December 2012 It's good news for women who put their baby plans on hold so they can focus on their careers.

Asparagus – the trendy vegetable that also "fights diabetes"

Asparagus is latest weapon in the fight against diabetes as study reveals it controls blood sugarHigh doses of asparagus extract had a significant effect on insulin production in tests UK consumption of asparagus is at record levels of around 8,000 tonnes a year<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 17:31 GMT, 21 November 2012 </p> <br> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/21/article-2236322-137AAC1D000005DC-350_233x334.jpg" width="233" height="334" alt="Culinary cure It appears asparagus could have a vital role to play in combating Britains looming diabetes crisis" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Culinary cure It appears asparagus could have a vital role to play in combating Britain's looming diabetes crisis</p> <p>Asparagus could be a powerful new culinary weapon in the fight against diabetes.</p><p>Scientists have found regular intake of the increasingly popular vegetable keeps blood sugar levels under control and boosts the body&#8217;s production of insulin, the hormone that helps it to absorb glucose.</p><p>UK consumption of asparagus has soared in recent years to record levels of around 8,000 tonnes a year.</p><p>As well as its delicate flavour, it now appears it could have a vital role to play in combating Britain&#8217;s looming diabetes crisis.</p><p>Type two diabetes, which accounts for 90 per cent of all diabetes cases, is emerging as a major health burden.</p><p>According to the charity Diabetes UK, at the current rate of increase, the numbers affected will rise from around 2.5 million to four million by 2025 and five million by 2030.</p><p>More than a million people are already affected by the condition but do not realise they have it, perhaps because they do not recognise symptoms, such as fatigue, thirst, frequent urination, recurrent thrush and wounds that are slow to heal.</p><p> </p><p>Left untreated, type two diabetes can raise the risk of heart attacks, blindness and amputation.

Greg Rusedski: "Anybody who thinks they"re happy all the time is probably lying"

'Anybody who thinks they're happy all the time is probably lying': Under the microscope with Greg Rusedski | UPDATED: 01:22 GMT, 26 June 2012 The former British No 1 tennis player, 38, on eating junk food, his fear of flying and the reality of being a sportsman 'I retired four years ago and the nice thing now is that I can be more sociable with my friends,' said Greg Rusedski IS YOUR DIET LESS HEALTHY NOW YOU’VE RETIRED A lot of people think professional tennis players have a phenomenal diet.

Dehydrated baby nearly died after twice being turned away from hospital by receptionists because of lack of doctors

Dehydrated baby nearly died after twice being turned away from hospital by receptionists because of lack of doctorsMichaela was told by a matron that the blunder happened because the hospital was 'understaffed' and morale was low | UPDATED: 13:00 GMT, 22 May 2012 The mother of a baby boy who was turned away twice by hospital receptionists today said he nearly died because of a lack of doctors.

Oral cancer cases have risen above 6,000 a year for the first time, figures reveal

Mouth cancer cases soar above 6,000 a year for the first time, figures reveal, thanks to rise in oral sexOral cancer cases have risen above 6,000 a year | UPDATED: 08:19 GMT, 16 March 2012 On the increase: Oral cancer cases have reached 6,000 a year for the first time, with two thirds of new cases being among men Oral cancer cases have risen above 6,000 a year for the first time, figures revealed today.