The cancer survival lottery: More patients are surviving than ever but where you live can make a real difference

The cancer survival lottery: More patients are surviving than ever but where you live can make a real difference For men, biggest increase in survival was in colon and prostate cancerIn women, biggest leap in survival was seen in cervical cancer patientsBut patients still face wide variations depending on where they live By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 18:06 GMT, 18 April 2013 | UPDATED: 18:06 GMT, 18 April 2013 Cancer patients face 'wide and persistent' variations in survival rates depending on where they live, according to a new report.

Single test to detect three types of cancer in women which claim 7,000 lives a year

Single test to detect three types of cancer in women which claim 7,000 lives a yearNew test can detect cancer of the cervix, womb and ovaries During trials, it found 40% of ovarian tumours – known as 'the silent killer' This method had a 100% success rate in detecting endometrial cancer on the lining on the womb By Fiona Macrae PUBLISHED: 19:47 GMT, 9 January 2013 | UPDATED: 20:24 GMT, 9 January 2013 Breakthrough: The test – based on the existing smear test to detect cervical cancer – can also find ovarian and endometrial cancers (stock image) A major breakthrough in the battle against female cancer was signalled last night with the emergence of a single test to detect three different types of the disease.

Doctors perform world"s first uterus transplant between a MOTHER and her DAUGHTER

Doctors perform world's first uterus transplant between a MOTHER and her DAUGHTER Two women in their thirties received their mother's uterus They will need to wait for one year before undergoing IVFIf procedure works it will be the first time a mother and daughter will have grown in the same womb Women stop producing eggs around the age of 50 but their wombs can remain viable past 60 | UPDATED: 06:54 GMT, 19 September 2012 Doctors have carried out the world’s first womb transplants between a mother and daughter.

Bowel cancer could be fuelled by E coli stomach bug

Bowel cancer 'could be fuelled by E coli stomach bug' Two-thirds of the 21 samples taken from bowel cancer patients contained the bug, compared to just one in five of those taken from healthy people | UPDATED: 14:12 GMT, 20 August 2012 One of Britain’s most common cancers could be fuelled by the E coli stomach bug, scientists believe.

Mother, 37, left infertile after doctors misread smear tests TWICE leaving cervical cancer to grow

Mother, 37, left infertile after doctors misread TWO smear tests leaving her prey to cervical cancer Mrs Millward insisted on another smear test seven months earlier than her appointment, saving her own life according to a medical expert | UPDATED: 15:56 GMT, 9 July 2012 A mother who developed cervical cancer and was left infertile after her smear test results were misread twice has been awarded 50,000 compensation.

"My newborn baby saved my life": Mother recovers after doctors found cervical cancer during birth and gave her 18 months to live

'My newborn baby saved my life': Mother beats cervical cancer after doctors find tumour during birth and give her just 18 months to live Doctors would not have found tumour if Naomi Jacobs had not been pregnantShe was given room so baby Lily could be with her during treatmentSurvival rate for large cell neuroendocrine cancer just 20% | UPDATED: 15:20 GMT, 8 June 2012 When Naomi Jacobs gave birth to a beautiful baby girl, it should have been the happiest time of her life.

Student nurse, 22, calls for earlier cervical cancer screening after she is diagnosed at 20

Student nurse, 22, calls for earlier cervical cancer screening after she was diagnosed at 20 Hannah decided to become a nurse after being treated for cancer | UPDATED: 16:51 GMT, 12 April 2012 A student nurse is campaigning to lower the age for cervical cancer screening after she was diagnosed with the disease when she was just 20 years old.

Prepare: Seven vital steps to making the most of time with your GP

Prepare: Seven vital steps to making the most of time with your doctor and an easy way to remember them | UPDATED: 22:27 GMT, 24 March 2012 When you go to see your GP, you have about ten minutes to tell him or her what’s wrong, for them to understand that, make a diagnosis (if one hasn’t been made) and decide on a course of action.