Could a problematic gene be the key to solving infertility problems?

Could a rogue gene be to blame for infertility problems Chromosomes must 'huddle' together to ensure an egg’s healthy development and fertilisationBut when the gene SRPK is missing, they cannot do this, say Edinburgh scientists By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 15:57 GMT, 26 November 2012 | UPDATED: 15:57 GMT, 26 November 2012 Scientists have identified a gene which could help solve the problem of infertility in humans.

Mother told to consider aborting her baby three times after doctor misread scan refuses and has healthy daughter

I refused to give up on her: Mother has healthy daughter despite being told THREE times by doctor to abort her Ms Chilvers had to wait an agonising five weeks before a second scan revealed her baby was healthy | UPDATED: 12:23 GMT, 13 July 2012 A mother who said she was told to have an abortion three times has described her relief after she gave birth to a healthy girl.

Toddler with condition so rare only five people in Britain have it and doctors dont know what will happen to him

Tiny toddler has such a rare genetic condition that doctors don't know what will happen to him Only five known sufferers of chromosome ring 18 in UK and 150 worldwide | UPDATED: 13:16 GMT, 3 April 2012 Rare: George Donlan has an unusual genetic disorder that has only 150 known sufferers worldwide A tiny toddler has such a rare genetic condition that his parents have no idea what his future will hold.

New blood test could tell mother sex of unborn child as early as FIVE WEEKS

New blood test could tell mother sex of unborn child as early as FIVE WEEKS Researchers warn test has potential for encouraging sex-selection Pregnant women could find out whether they are carrying a boy or a girl as early as five weeks, after scientists developed a pioneering non-invasive test. A team at Cheil General Hospital in Seoul, South Korea, found that various ratios of two enzymes, which can be extracted from a pregnant mother's blood, indicate the baby's gender as early as five or six weeks.