Being stressed CAN be good for you – it boosts memory

Being stressed CAN be good for you – it boosts memory Chronic stress has been shown to increase the risk of heart attack and compromise the immune systemBut short-lived stress primes the brain for improved performance – most notably boosting memoryResearchers say it encourages stem cells in the brain to turn into new nerve cells that boost mental agility By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 11:24 GMT, 17 April 2013 | UPDATED: 11:43 GMT, 17 April 2013 Overworked and stressed out Look on the bright side – some stress is good for you.

Drinking too much? Head to the gym: Exercise can repair damage to the brain caused by alcohol

Drinking too much Head to the gym: Exercise can repair damage to the brain caused by alcohol Aerobic exercise such as jogging may alleviate some of the white-matter damage caused by heavy drinkingExercise can slow cognitive decline related with age By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 20:04 GMT, 16 April 2013 | UPDATED: 20:04 GMT, 16 April 2013 Working out can help former heavy drinkers limit the damage alcohol has done to their brain.

Depression: Self-help books DO relieve the condition – and prevent it from returning even a year later

Self-help books DO relieve depression – and prevent it from returning Patients offered books had significantly lower levels of depression four months and a year laterSelf-help books based on the principles of 'talking therapy' cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) Books helped motivate people and encourage positive life changes, say Scottish researchers By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 16:44 GMT, 28 January 2013 | UPDATED: 16:51 GMT, 28 January 2013 Prescribing self-help books on the NHS is an effective treatment for depression Reading a self-help book really can alleviate depression, new research suggests.

med diet

A Mediterranean diet WON'T stave off dementia or boost concentration in old age No evidence that eating plenty of fruit, veg and oily fish boosts concentration in old age, say French expertsUntil now, theory has been that diet prevents the blood vessels that supply the brain becoming blocked By Sophie Borland PUBLISHED: 17:33 GMT, 25 January 2013 | UPDATED: 00:50 GMT, 26 January 2013 A Mediterranean diet does little for the brain and won’t prevent dementia, researchers claim.

Speaking two languages from childhood keeps brain in good shape as we age

Trs bien! Speaking two languages from childhood keeps brain in good shape as we age Pensioners who spoke two languages from childhood were far quicker at switching between mental tasksBilinguals also expended less mental energy, suggesting they were using their brains more efficiently By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 10:57 GMT, 9 January 2013 | UPDATED: 13:23 GMT, 9 January 2013 Hours spent in language classes struggling with masculine and feminine nouns and upside down punctuation may all be worth it, say scientists.

The reason we blink? Most of the time it"s so our brains can switch off

The reason we blink Most of the time it's so our brains can switch off When we blink, our brains goes into idle mode where thoughts wander freely, say Japanese researchers These mental breaks can last anywhere from a split second to a few seconds before attention is fully restored Most of us take between 15 and 20 such moments of downtime per MINUTE By Emily Payne PUBLISHED: 19:00 GMT, 2 January 2013 | UPDATED: 19:01 GMT, 2 January 2013 We spend around 10 per cent of our waking hours with our eyes shut.

Half the impact of sleeping pills "is due to placebo effect: Findings cast doubt over effectiveness of medication

Half the impact of sleeping pills 'is due to placebo effect': Findings cast doubt over effectiveness of medicationStudy finds 'placebo affect' is behind much of the drug's benefitSleeping pills have wide range of side effects, such as memory loss and imbalanceScientists urge insomnia sufferers to seek out psychological treatment PUBLISHED: 01:08 GMT, 21 December 2012 | UPDATED: 01:08 GMT, 21 December 2012 Placebo: Much of the effects of sleeping pills are in the mind , according to a new report Around half the benefit of taking sleeping pills comes from the placebo effect – where people get better even when they are taking a ‘dummy’ drug, according to a study.

Forget energy drinks – they"re no more effective than a cup of coffee

Forget energy drinks – they're no more effective than a cup of coffee 'Overwhelming lack of evidence' that ingredients such as guarana enhance physical or cognitive performanceNew research suggests only useful ingredient is a generous dose of caffeine | UPDATED: 16:13 GMT, 14 December 2012 New research suggests it is simply caffeine, rather than added ingredients such as guarana or taurine, that make energy drinks effective With buzz-word ingredients such as guarana and ginseng, energy drinks have been heralded for their mind and body-boosting qualities.

Doctors use broken bones to help unmask dementia in elderly patients who may otherwise not be diagnosed

Doctors use broken bones to help unmask dementia in elderly patients who may otherwise not be diagnosed | UPDATED: 10:02 GMT, 10 December 2012 Brain impairment caused by conditions such as Alzheimer's makes falling over and suffering breaks more likely Doctors are using broken wrists to diagnose dementia in elderly patients.