Amy Roberts admits alcohol turned me into a crazed animal: Binge drinking teen blames booze for transforming her from shy girl into violent criminal

Alcohol turned me into a crazed animal: Binge drinking teen blames booze for making her a violent criminalAmy Roberts from Glasgow was arrested 30 times She bit a police officer and punched a landlord in the face when drunkWake up call came after she was sent to prisonNow she's warning others how binge drinking 'wrecks lives' By Lucy Waterlow PUBLISHED: 00:32 GMT, 26 March 2013 | UPDATED: 02:41 GMT, 26 March 2013 Regrets: Amy Roberts committed 30 drunken offences between the ages of 16 and 18 A young woman who was arrested 30 times for drunken attacks – including punching police officers – has warned against the dangers of binge drinking.

Giving criminals with ADHD medication could stop them from re-offending, say experts

Giving criminals with ADHD medication could stop them from re-offending, say expertsAround four per cent of children in the UK and half as many adults are believed to suffer from ADHDCriminal behaviour in those with the disorder falls by about 30% when they are on medication, research shows <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 07:52 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <p>Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending, a study suggests.</p><p>Criminal behaviour in people diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) falls by about a third when they are on medication, the research shows.</p><p>Translated to the prison population, similar treatment could have a dramatic effect, experts believe.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2237015-020D956F000004B0-159_468x406.jpg" width="468" height="406" alt="Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending</p> <p>Around four per cent of children in the UK and half as many adults are believed to suffer from the disorder, which is characterised by over-activity, impulsivity, aggression, short temper and disorganised thinking.</p><p>But a disproportionate number of people with ADHD end up being convicted of petty crimes, often related to violence and drug abuse.</p><p> </p><p>Studies suggest that anything from 10 per cent to 40 per cent of prison inmates have the disorder, but few are diagnosed or treated.</p><p>Treating ADHD-affected children with drugs such as the stimulant Ritalin is controversial because of the side effects, which can include nervous system disturbances and raised blood pressure and heart rate.</p>CONTROVERSIAL STUDY<br><p>The research was conducted in Sweden, where it is easy to access data on medical treatments and criminal convictions through national registries.</p><p>Scientists studied the records of more than 25,000 individuals with ADHD, mostly teenagers and young adults.</p><p>They found that over a period of four years, 37 per cent of the men and 15 per cent of the women were convicted of crimes, compared with a rate in the general population of 9 per cent and 2 per cent.</p><p>Drug treatment for ADHD was associated with a 32 per cent drop in offending rates by men and 41 per cent by women – an overall reduction of about a third.</p> <p>But the study authors say such drugs could have a real impact on crime, although their use would have to be carefully considered on a case-by-case basis.</p><p>The findings are published in the New England Journal of Medicine.</p><p>Professor Paul Lichtenstein, one of the researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, said: 'It's said that roughly 30 per cent to 40 per cent of long-serving criminals have ADHD.</p><p>'If their chances of recidivism can be reduced by 30 per cent, it would clearly affect total crime numbers in many societies.'</p><p>Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures.</p><p>Besides crime, ADHD is linked to many problems that can afflict a person's life, including poor academic performance, unemployment, alcohol and drug abuse, and relationship breakdown.</p><p>However, although the disorder is known to persist into adulthood, treatment invariably stops in adolescence.<br></p><p>British expert Professor Philip Asherson, from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London, said he would expect to see wide-ranging benefits if convicted criminals were regularly treated for ADHD.</p><p>'If they were in prison and showing aggressive or difficult behaviour, I'd hope to see a reduction in those aggressive behaviours,' he said.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2237015-0E207F4300000578-976_468x286.jpg" width="468" height="286" alt="Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures</p> <p>'I'd also expect to see more engagement with rehabilitation processes.

Using illegal drugs "is like eating junk food or gambling": Row as charity calls for a softer line on cannabis

Using illegal drugs 'is like eating junk food or gambling': Row as charity calls for a softer line on cannabis Taking cannabis classed as another 'risky' behaviour like a poor diet, finds the UK Drug Policy CommissionIndependent advisory body say growing cannabis for personal use should not be a criminal offence | UPDATED: 07:11 GMT, 15 October 2012 Taking drugs is just like eating junk food, a controversial report claims today.

Richard Eggers, 68, fired from Wells Fargo bank for “stealing” TEN CENTS when he was a TEENAGER

A 68-year-old bank employee fired for “stealing” TEN CENTS from a laundromat when he was a TEENAGER Richard Eggers, 68, tried to use a cardboard dime to get a free load of laundry back in 1963 when he was 19-years-oldA sheriff caught him and charged the teen with fraudHe, like many others, has now been fired from his job at Wells Fargo from the indiscretion that took place nearly a half century ago

20-year-old man caught by his father trying to rape his grandmother “because he couldn’t get a girlfriend”

20-year-old man caught by his father trying to rape his grandmother “because he couldn”t get a girlfriend”. A 20-year-old man attempted to rape his grandmother after complaining to her he could not get a girlfriend.