Marian Keyes on her battle with depression: "I begged my mother for permission to kill myself"

'I begged my mother for permission to kill myself': Bestselling author Marian Keyes opens up about her dark battle with depressionThe author has suffered from crippling depression since 2009She pulled through her darkest days with help from a therapistThe author has spoken of how baking has helped her cope By Steve Nolan PUBLISHED: 09:13 GMT, 12 April 2013 | UPDATED: 10:07 GMT, 12 April 2013 Battle: Best-selling author Marian Keyes has told how her depression drove her to beg her mother to let her kill herself in 2010 Bestselling author Marian Keyes has revealed how her crippling depression led her to beg her mother for permission to kill herself.

New mums need more post-natal depression checks to make sure they are bonding with their baby

New mums need more post-natal depression checks to make sure they are bonding with their babyMidwives and health visitors check on new mothers for up to six weeksAfter, they face months without a formal appraisal of how they are coping Child abuse charity The Wave Trust carried out the researchFound babies of depressed mothers likely to be 'aggressive and break law' By Andrew Levy PUBLISHED: 23:56 GMT, 21 March 2013 | UPDATED: 09:38 GMT, 22 March 2013 New mothers should be interviewed three to four months after they give birth to check they are bonding with their babies, according to a Government-commissioned report.

Feeling anxious or depressed "dramatically increases" the risk of dying from a heart attack

Feeling anxious or depressed 'dramatically increases' the risk of dying from a heart attack Even those with mild depression had an almost 60% increased risk of dying over the following 18 monthsHigh blood pressure is strongly linked to anxietyDepression is associated with behavioural risk factors, such as smoking and not taking medication By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 20:12 GMT, 19 March 2013 | UPDATED: 20:27 GMT, 19 March 2013 Feeling depressed or anxious dramatically increases the chances of heart patients dying, new research suggests.

New mums "are five times more at risk of OCD because they fear harming their child"

New mums 'are five times more at risk of OCD because they fear harming their child'More than one in 10 of those who have recently given birth have symptomsThey include fears of injuring baby, germs, and obsessing over mistakesAffects around three per cent of adults – sufferers include David Beckham By Nick Mcdermott PUBLISHED: 01:25 GMT, 5 March 2013 | UPDATED: 07:52 GMT, 5 March 2013 New mothers are up to five times more likely to have the condition than other women (posed by model) Worries about the responsibilities of motherhood are making women more prone to obsessive compulsive disorder.

Five disorders from depression to autism share a genetic link, which could pave way for new treatments

Five disorders from depression to autism share a genetic link, which could pave the way for new treatments Autism, ADHD, bipolar disorder, depression and schizophrenia overlap at a genetic level Two gene markers common to all of the disorders govern the balance of calcium in brain cellsNew understanding could help develop treatments By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 13:46 GMT, 28 February 2013 | UPDATED: 15:52 GMT, 28 February 2013 The five most common mental health and developmental disorders share a common genetic root, a study has found.

Mother of 3 girls Suzanne Doherty has hysterectomy only to be told afterwards she was pregnant with a son

Mother of three girls had hysterectomy only to be told afterwards she was pregnant and doctors aborted the son she always wanted Suzanne Doherty paid 62,000 in compensation after experts failed to spot the unborn child in her womb before the major operationShe woke up to be told she had been 14 weeks pregnant but the child had been abortedRoyal Cornwall Hospital in Truro apologise for the botched operation David Cameron's youngest child Florence was born there in 2010 | UPDATED: 01:00 GMT, 18 December 2012 A mother of three girls had a hysterectomy only to be told by doctors afterwards that while she slept they had also aborted the son she had always wanted but did not know she was carrying.

All school children in Britain should be tested for mental health illnesses, say experts

All school children in Britain should be tested for mental health illnesses, say experts Screening all 11-year-olds could reveal those at greater risk of conditions such as depression, claim researchersThis could help health authorities treat youngsters early and stop them descending into more hard to treat conditions However, other experts warn that labeling people as 'vulnerable' at such a young age could do more harm than good | UPDATED: 11:08 GMT, 29 November 2012 All school children should be screened for risk of mental illnesses such as depression, say leading mental health experts.

Arguing parents can give a child teenage depression

Arguing parents can give a child teenage depression Children and teenagers who saw arguments were significantly likelier to have mental health problemsResearchers have now devised a test to identify those at risk of depression so children can be helped earlier | UPDATED: 00:38 GMT, 29 November 2012 Children who often see their parents having rows are at risk of depression, experts have warned.

Fat people ARE more jolly – because their genes mean they"re less likely to get depressed

Fat people really ARE more jolly – because their genes mean they're less likely to get depressed Scientists from McMaster University in Canada found the so called 'fat gene' FTO is also a 'happy gene', tooAssociated with an eight per cent reduction in the risk of depression <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 18:16 GMT, 20 November 2012 </p> <br><p>The word 'jolly' has long been a byword word for 'plump' – hijacked by experts in the back handed compliment.</p><p>But scientists believe there could be genetic evidence which explains why fat people are often happier than their skinny friends.</p><p>It comes after Strictly favourite Lisa Riley has been flying the flag for larger women insisting she is a 'big, happy girl', more than comfortable with her size.

Hating your job is as bad for your health as being unemployed, researchers warn

Hating your job is as bad for your health as being unemployed, researchers warn A demanding job, nasty boss and poor job security are as bad for your mental health as being out of workOnly those who enjoy their jobs fare betterAlso linked to increased risk of heart disease<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 12:50 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <p>Having a job you hate is as bad for your mental health as being unemployed, Australian researchers have claimed.</p><p>They say that people with poor working conditions suffer just as much as those out of work.<br></p><p>And they weren&#8217;t just referring to a dusty factory or dimly lit office, but psychological factors such as a demanding job, nasty boss and poor job security.