Parents who tell children to finish everything on their plates are fuelling obesity

Parents who tell children to finish everything on their plates are 'fuelling obesity' Parents still encourage children to finish all their food, even though portion sizes have increased Means children can no longer tell when they are fullFathers are more likely to insist on clean plates than mothers and are more likely to pressurise sons By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 16:47 GMT, 23 April 2013 | UPDATED: 16:52 GMT, 23 April 2013 Parents are still encouraging children to finish their food even though portions have got bigger Parents have long encouraged children to finish everything on their plates, not least because of guilt about wasting food.

Britons are eating their way to a lifetime of illness: Most fail to manage five fruit and veg a day

Britons are eating their way to a lifetime of illness: Most fail to manage five fruit and veg a dayAlmost half of us have high cholesterolQuarter have high blood pressure | UPDATED: 06:51 GMT, 26 July 2012 Britons are condemning themselves to a lifetime of serious illnesses with their appalling diets, experts warn.

Taking multi-vitamin pills "does nothing for our health"

Taking multi-vitamin pills “does nothing for our health” Research shows vitamin takers are just as likely to develop cancer or heart disease as those who take no tablets New research shows that taking supplements can actually harm you They are a daily essential for millions of Britons hoping to ward off ill-health. But despite the millions of pounds spent on vitamin pills, they do nothing for our health, according to a major study

Obesity crisis in primary schools as one-in-five 11-year-olds are now grossly overweight

Obesity crisis in schools: How one child in three is too fat by the age of 11NHS data reveals 19 per cent of Year 6 children obeseLondon has highest proportion of obese childrenObesity more common in towns and cities than rural areas Obesity is also more common in towns and cities than rural areas, according to newly-released data One child in three is overweight when they leave primary school at the age of 11, alarming figures reveal. Almost a fifth are classed as obese, meaning they are so fat they risk knocking years off their lives. And the number of ten and 11-year-olds who fall into this category has risen by nearly 10 per cent in just four years, according to NHS data.