A diabetes epidemic and supermarkets who are pushers for an addictive drug called sugar

A diabetes epidemic and supermarkets who are pushers for an addictive drug called sugar By Joanna Blythman PUBLISHED: 23:39 GMT, 4 March 2013 | UPDATED: 10:23 GMT, 5 March 2013 The obesity epidemic is worsening, with drastic consequences for the nation’s health.

Obesity could be caused by gut bacteria rather than over-eating

It's not your fault you're fat: Obesity could be caused by gut bacteria rather than over-eating Study suggests the bacteria plays a larger role than eating too much or not exercising enoughResearchers found diet that altered gut bacteria caused dramatic weight loss | UPDATED: 13:58 GMT, 19 December 2012 Worried about your weight Chinese researchers claim a diet that reduces enterobacter bacterium could help Obesity may be caused by a certain kind of bacteria rather than eating too much or exercising too little, researchers claim.

How doctors performed open-heart surgery on baby Jessica just 20 minutes after she was born

A Christmas miracle: Step by dramatic step, how doctors performed open-heart surgery on baby Jessica just 20 minutes after she was born | UPDATED: 10:13 GMT, 18 December 2012 Just 20 weeks into her pregnancy, Claire Muse, 31, a computer technician from Newcastle, was told that her unborn daughter had a serious heart defect.

A Christmas miracle: Step by dramatic step, how doctors performed open-heart surgery on baby Jessica Muse just 20 minutes after she was born

A Christmas miracle: Step by dramatic step, how doctors performed open-heart surgery on baby Jessica just 20 minutes after she was born | UPDATED: 03:21 GMT, 18 December 2012 Just 20 weeks into her pregnancy, Claire Muse, 31, a computer technician from Newcastle, was told that her unborn daughter had a serious heart defect.

Living near a busy road may double the risk of autism, researchers warn

Living near a busy road may double the risk of autism, researchers warn Exposure to air pollution in the womb or during the first year of life was linked to a dramatic increase chances of having the disorderChildren from homes with the highest traffic pollution levels were three times more at risk | UPDATED: 23:40 GMT, 26 November 2012 Living near a busy road could double the risk of childhood autism, warn scientists.

11-year-old Abigail Lightbown dies from brain tumour after parents mistook symptoms for eating disorder

Girl, 11, dies of brain cancer after parents feared she was battling an eating disorder and making herself sick to look like ‘stick thin celebrities’ Cancer discovered after seven month battle during which she lost 4kgShe endured two rounds of chemo but never gave up hopeMan Utd and Coronation Street stars paid her hospital visits | UPDATED: 19:40 GMT, 26 November 2012 Brave: Abigail, who died on November 10, never complained about her illness and refused to give up hope that her condition would improve An 11-year-old girl who was suspected of having an eating disorder has died after doctors discovered she was unwittingly battling brain cancer.

Giving criminals with ADHD medication could stop them from re-offending, say experts

Giving criminals with ADHD medication could stop them from re-offending, say expertsAround four per cent of children in the UK and half as many adults are believed to suffer from ADHDCriminal behaviour in those with the disorder falls by about 30% when they are on medication, research shows <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 07:52 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <p>Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending, a study suggests.</p><p>Criminal behaviour in people diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) falls by about a third when they are on medication, the research shows.</p><p>Translated to the prison population, similar treatment could have a dramatic effect, experts believe.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2237015-020D956F000004B0-159_468x406.jpg" width="468" height="406" alt="Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending</p> <p>Around four per cent of children in the UK and half as many adults are believed to suffer from the disorder, which is characterised by over-activity, impulsivity, aggression, short temper and disorganised thinking.</p><p>But a disproportionate number of people with ADHD end up being convicted of petty crimes, often related to violence and drug abuse.</p><p> </p><p>Studies suggest that anything from 10 per cent to 40 per cent of prison inmates have the disorder, but few are diagnosed or treated.</p><p>Treating ADHD-affected children with drugs such as the stimulant Ritalin is controversial because of the side effects, which can include nervous system disturbances and raised blood pressure and heart rate.</p>CONTROVERSIAL STUDY<br><p>The research was conducted in Sweden, where it is easy to access data on medical treatments and criminal convictions through national registries.</p><p>Scientists studied the records of more than 25,000 individuals with ADHD, mostly teenagers and young adults.</p><p>They found that over a period of four years, 37 per cent of the men and 15 per cent of the women were convicted of crimes, compared with a rate in the general population of 9 per cent and 2 per cent.</p><p>Drug treatment for ADHD was associated with a 32 per cent drop in offending rates by men and 41 per cent by women – an overall reduction of about a third.</p> <p>But the study authors say such drugs could have a real impact on crime, although their use would have to be carefully considered on a case-by-case basis.</p><p>The findings are published in the New England Journal of Medicine.</p><p>Professor Paul Lichtenstein, one of the researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, said: 'It's said that roughly 30 per cent to 40 per cent of long-serving criminals have ADHD.</p><p>'If their chances of recidivism can be reduced by 30 per cent, it would clearly affect total crime numbers in many societies.'</p><p>Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures.</p><p>Besides crime, ADHD is linked to many problems that can afflict a person's life, including poor academic performance, unemployment, alcohol and drug abuse, and relationship breakdown.</p><p>However, although the disorder is known to persist into adulthood, treatment invariably stops in adolescence.<br></p><p>British expert Professor Philip Asherson, from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London, said he would expect to see wide-ranging benefits if convicted criminals were regularly treated for ADHD.</p><p>'If they were in prison and showing aggressive or difficult behaviour, I'd hope to see a reduction in those aggressive behaviours,' he said.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2237015-0E207F4300000578-976_468x286.jpg" width="468" height="286" alt="Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures</p> <p>'I'd also expect to see more engagement with rehabilitation processes.

Schoolgirl wrongly diagnosed with eating disorder actually had two brain tumours that were making her throw up every morning

Schoolgirl diagnosed with eating disorder actually had two brain tumours that were making her sick every morningAbigail Lightbown was nine when she suffered dramatic weight loss and a continually upset stomachShe was given given acid reflux medication, but seven months later fainted She was rushed to hospital for an MRI scan and diagnosed with brain cancer | UPDATED: 09:46 GMT, 14 September 2012 When Abigail Lightbown suffered dramatic weight loss and was continually being sick, her parents feared she may have developed an eating disorder.