Love cooking? You might have a healthy diet but you"ll spend less time exercising, warn experts

Love cooking You might have a healthy diet, but you'll spend less time exercising Those who exercise are more likely to make meals from scratch as both are part of a healthy lifestyleHowever, one tends to be substituted for the other, as many people don't have time to do bothAs a result, many cooks subconsciously sacrifice time they could spend exercising to make meals By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 10:50 GMT, 15 April 2013 | UPDATED: 10:50 GMT, 15 April 2013 People who spend more time in the kitchen spend less time exercising, according to new research.

Husbands and wives at risk of serious illness as married people are proven to overestimate how healthy they are

Does being married really make you healthier Husbands and wives are 'more likely than singletons to overestimate how well they are'Married people tend to overestimate their level of health compared to those who are singleSeem to have a different concept of what constitutes bad healthMay be more able to cope with illness due to the support a spouse offersBy the time a wedded person describes themselves as in ‘poor health’ they tend to be much sicker than a single person Study still supported findings that overall being unmarried significantly increases the risk of death within three years By Katy Winter PUBLISHED: 14:21 GMT, 21 March 2013 | UPDATED: 18:32 GMT, 21 March 2013 A married person will be sicker than a single person when they describe themselves as in 'poor health' For married couples, the stability of a happy relationship, and having a partner to support them 'in sickness and in health', can make them feel invincible should they fall ill.

Cutting salt could save 20,000 lives each year in UK

Cutting salt could save 20,000 lives each year in UK Too much salt increases risk of high blood pressure, which can lead to heart attacks and strokeAdults should consume no more than 6g a day, but on average UK men have 9.7g and women have 7.7g By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 11:41 GMT, 12 February 2013 | UPDATED: 11:41 GMT, 12 February 2013 Reducing the amount of salt in our diets could save nearly 20,000 lives in the UK every year, according to researchers.

Homeopathy is "rubbish" and shouldn"t be available on the NHS, says chief medical officer

Homeopathy is 'rubbish' and shouldn't be available on the NHS, says Britain's top doctor NHS spends 4m a year on homeopathy treatmentsAlternative therapy involves treating 'like with like', using very diluted substancesDame Sally and the BMA say it is due to placebo effectDefenders say homeopathy has passed more clinical trials than it had failedHealth Secretary Jeremy Hunt and Prince Charles have both endorsed treatment By Fiona Macrae PUBLISHED: 17:30 GMT, 23 January 2013 | UPDATED: 01:59 GMT, 24 January 2013 Homeopathy was condemned as ‘rubbish’ by Britain’s chief medical officer yesterday, who admitted she is ‘perpetually surprised’ it is available on the NHS.

How booze plays havoc with your rest: Alcohol reduces amount of time spent in deep sleep

How booze plays havoc with your rest: Alcohol reduces amount of time spent in deep sleep It helps you get to sleep quicker but rest is disrupted, report findsThe more alcohol consumed, the less deep sleep takes placeAlcohol should not be used as sleeping aid, researchers warn By Daily Mail Reporter PUBLISHED: 01:58 GMT, 23 January 2013 | UPDATED: 01:58 GMT, 23 January 2013 Alcohol may help you fall asleep but it leads to a disrupted night’s rest, scientists reported yesterday.

Viagra could help men fight the flab as well as boost their sex life

Viagra could help men fight the flab as well as boost their sex life Drug converts undesirable white fat cells into beige fat which burns calories instead of storing itTests in mice found it could also reduce the risk of obesity complications by tackling inflammation By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 09:40 GMT, 18 January 2013 | UPDATED: 09:40 GMT, 18 January 2013 Men who have trouble becoming aroused during sex have long relied on Viagra to give them a 'boost'.

Tea up! How four cups a day can slash the risk of a stroke

Teas up! How four cups a day can slash the risk of a stroke Drinking four cups of tea a day reduced risk of stroke by 21% compared to those who never drank teaA cuppa is packed with compounds called flavonoids that are thought to be good for the heart and brain By Pat Hagan PUBLISHED: 13:28 GMT, 9 January 2013 | UPDATED: 13:56 GMT, 9 January 2013 A calming cuppa: Tea is packed with components called flavonoids that are thought to be good for the heart and brain Drinking four cups of tea a day can reduce the risk of a stroke by more than a fifth, according to new research.

Stress is as bad for the heart as smoking five cigarettes a day

Being stressed is as damaging for your heart as smoking five cigarettes a day People who reported feeling stressed were 27 per cent more likely to suffer a heart attack Stress raises blood pressure and levels of 'bad' cholesterolResearchers liken the effect to smoking five cigarettes a day – and the effect gets worse as we age | UPDATED: 18:45 GMT, 18 December 2012 Are you stressed If so, your chances of heading to an early grave are significantly higher.

Giving criminals with ADHD medication could stop them from re-offending, say experts

Giving criminals with ADHD medication could stop them from re-offending, say expertsAround four per cent of children in the UK and half as many adults are believed to suffer from ADHDCriminal behaviour in those with the disorder falls by about 30% when they are on medication, research shows <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 07:52 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <p>Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending, a study suggests.</p><p>Criminal behaviour in people diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) falls by about a third when they are on medication, the research shows.</p><p>Translated to the prison population, similar treatment could have a dramatic effect, experts believe.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2237015-020D956F000004B0-159_468x406.jpg" width="468" height="406" alt="Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending</p> <p>Around four per cent of children in the UK and half as many adults are believed to suffer from the disorder, which is characterised by over-activity, impulsivity, aggression, short temper and disorganised thinking.</p><p>But a disproportionate number of people with ADHD end up being convicted of petty crimes, often related to violence and drug abuse.</p><p> </p><p>Studies suggest that anything from 10 per cent to 40 per cent of prison inmates have the disorder, but few are diagnosed or treated.</p><p>Treating ADHD-affected children with drugs such as the stimulant Ritalin is controversial because of the side effects, which can include nervous system disturbances and raised blood pressure and heart rate.</p>CONTROVERSIAL STUDY<br><p>The research was conducted in Sweden, where it is easy to access data on medical treatments and criminal convictions through national registries.</p><p>Scientists studied the records of more than 25,000 individuals with ADHD, mostly teenagers and young adults.</p><p>They found that over a period of four years, 37 per cent of the men and 15 per cent of the women were convicted of crimes, compared with a rate in the general population of 9 per cent and 2 per cent.</p><p>Drug treatment for ADHD was associated with a 32 per cent drop in offending rates by men and 41 per cent by women – an overall reduction of about a third.</p> <p>But the study authors say such drugs could have a real impact on crime, although their use would have to be carefully considered on a case-by-case basis.</p><p>The findings are published in the New England Journal of Medicine.</p><p>Professor Paul Lichtenstein, one of the researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, said: 'It's said that roughly 30 per cent to 40 per cent of long-serving criminals have ADHD.</p><p>'If their chances of recidivism can be reduced by 30 per cent, it would clearly affect total crime numbers in many societies.'</p><p>Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures.</p><p>Besides crime, ADHD is linked to many problems that can afflict a person's life, including poor academic performance, unemployment, alcohol and drug abuse, and relationship breakdown.</p><p>However, although the disorder is known to persist into adulthood, treatment invariably stops in adolescence.<br></p><p>British expert Professor Philip Asherson, from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London, said he would expect to see wide-ranging benefits if convicted criminals were regularly treated for ADHD.</p><p>'If they were in prison and showing aggressive or difficult behaviour, I'd hope to see a reduction in those aggressive behaviours,' he said.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2237015-0E207F4300000578-976_468x286.jpg" width="468" height="286" alt="Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures</p> <p>'I'd also expect to see more engagement with rehabilitation processes.