NHS pays out 2million after surgeon botches operations – and there are still 94 OUTSTANDING claims

NHS pays out 2million after surgeon botches operations – and there are still 94 OUTSTANDING claims 2million of compensation has been paid out to Manjit Bhamra's patients at Rotherham HospitalThere are another 94 outstanding claims against himDespite this, he is STILL working as a surgeon By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 19:04 GMT, 28 February 2013 | UPDATED: 07:48 GMT, 1 March 2013 Surgeon Manjit Bhamra is still practising, despite the NHS forking out close to 2million for botched operations The NHS has paid out more than 2m in compensation to victims of a surgeon who is still allowed to work.

Forget tennis elbow, we"re all suffering from "office knee" – and desk jobs and obesity are to blame

Forget tennis elbow, we're all suffering from 'office knee' – and desk jobs and obesity are to blame <br>Almost a quarter of workers aged 16 to 65 surveyed said they have been living with pain for up to two years Obesity, the rise of the internet and desk based jobs have been blamed for the latest in a line of joint ailments <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 15:23 GMT, 20 November 2012 </p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/20/article-2235771-1621DD02000005DC-975_306x423.jpg" width="306" height="423" alt="More than a quarter of UK workers are suffering from painful knee joints, a new survey has revealed" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">More than a quarter of UK workers are suffering from painful knee joints, a new survey has revealed</p> <p>More than a quarter of UK workers are suffering from painful knee joints, it has been revealed.</p><p>And surgeons and physiotherapists say that rising levels of obesity and desk-based jobs across all age groups are to blame.

Me and my operation: How a teaspoon of my own blood banished years of foot pain

Me and my operation: How a teaspoon of my own blood banished years of foot pain | UPDATED: 21:28 GMT, 16 April 2012 Patients with conditions such as tennis elbow and plantar fasciitis, which triggers pain under the heel, are being injected with their own blood to boost healing.