Why you shouldn"t get sick in a cold snap – it takes ambulances longer to respond

Why you shouldn't get sick in a cold snap – it can take ambulances twice as long to respond Study looked at how long it took ambulances to arrive at emergencies in Birmingham between 2007 and 2011Ambulance response time dropped 1.3% for each degree drop in temperatureDuring December 2010 ambulances took 15minutes rather than average eight minutesIncreased demand and treacherous road conditions blamed By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 23:44 GMT, 27 February 2013 | UPDATED: 23:44 GMT, 27 February 2013 It's common knowledge that it's better to get sick on a weekday because hospitals aren't as well staffed on weekends.

Trainee doctors should ignore EU rules and work longer, says Britain"s top surgeon

Trainee doctors should ignore EU rules and work LONGER, says Britain's top surgeon European Directive limits doctors to a 48-hour week with defined rest periodsFrequent patient handovers between teams could lead to mistakes in care, warns Prof Normal WilliamsAdded it did not give enough time for trainingBut junior doctors' representative warned scrapping rule could see a return to 100-hour weeks By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 09:21 GMT, 28 January 2013 | UPDATED: 09:21 GMT, 28 January 2013 Exhausted: Before the European Working Time Directive, some junior doctors were working 100-hour weeks.

Neurological emergencies up by a third as patient care worsens, study finds

Neurological emergencies up by a third as patient care worsens, study finds Emergency hospital admissions for conditions such as Parkinson”s and multiple sclerosis up by a third Trend developed despite extra investment According to a report emergency hospital admissions for neurological conditions have risen by around a third The number of people suffering from neurological disorders has increased, despite extra spending a report has shown. According to the National Audit Office (NAO) emergency hospital admissions for conditions such as Parkinson”s, multiple sclerosis and motor neurone diseases have risen by around a third.