Love cooking? You might have a healthy diet but you"ll spend less time exercising, warn experts

Love cooking You might have a healthy diet, but you'll spend less time exercising Those who exercise are more likely to make meals from scratch as both are part of a healthy lifestyleHowever, one tends to be substituted for the other, as many people don't have time to do bothAs a result, many cooks subconsciously sacrifice time they could spend exercising to make meals By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 10:50 GMT, 15 April 2013 | UPDATED: 10:50 GMT, 15 April 2013 People who spend more time in the kitchen spend less time exercising, according to new research.

First there was norovirus, then came flu and next there will be whooping cough as figures show there have been 9,000 cases this year

First there was norovirus, then came flu, now whooping cough makes a comeback with 9,000 cases this year Number of whooping cough cases increased by nearly ten times last yearFigures for November show a total of 1,080 confirmed casesMeanwhile, flu cases highest in children aged five to 14, says HPANorth East England appears to be worst affected area of the country Doctors given the green light to prescribe antivirals to those who need themThose in at-risk groups yet to be vaccinated are urged to have flu jab | UPDATED: 15:54 GMT, 22 December 2012 The number of cases of whooping cough has jumped from 944 last year to nearly 9,000 this year, according to the latest figures After doctors up and down the country have dealt with an influx of patients suffering from norovirus, followed up by a wave of flu patients, medical staff are now gearing themselves for people needing help for whooping cough.

It"s the news Popeye"s been waiting for: Spinach could help fight off dementia (and carrots and apricots too)

It's the news Popeye's been waiting for: Spinach could help fight off dementia (and carrots and apricots too) Researchers have discovered a link between low vitamin C, beta-carotene levels and dementiaAntioxidant rich fruit and vegetables – such as spinach, carrots and apricots – could help fight dementia | UPDATED: 15:22 GMT, 12 September 2012 It's welcome news for Popeye.

Too much light at night "could be bad for health"

Too much artificial light at night from gadgets and lamps could be bad for health and is even linked to cancer, say doctors AMA says further research needed into possible link between artificial light and cancer | UPDATED: 15:28 GMT, 22 June 2012 Artificial light is essential for modern societies to function, but doctors fear our 24/7 culture could have unintended consequences for human health.

HRT breast cancer alert that led to thousands of women abandoning treatment was "based on bad research"

HRT breast cancer alert that led to thousands of women abandoning treatment was 'based on bad research' British research which linked HRT to breast cancer and led to hundreds of thousands of women abandoning the treatment was ‘unreliable and defective’, says a damning review.

Heart attack risk is 21 times higher on first day of bereavement

Losing a loved one really can break your heart: Study finds attack risk is 21 times higher on first day of bereavement The death of a loved one makes you up to 21 times more likely to suffer a heart attack within a day of your loss, cardiologists say. During the first week of bereavement, the risk is almost six times higher than normal. It slowly declines during the month that follows, a study found.

Losing a loved one really can break your heart: Study finds attack risk is 21 times higher on first day of bereavement

Losing a loved one really can break your heart: Study finds attack risk is 21 times higher on first day of bereavement The death of a loved one makes you up to 21 times more likely to suffer a heart attack within a day of your loss, cardiologists say. During the first week of bereavement, the risk is almost six times higher than normal

Deaths from brain-eating amoeba linked to sinus remedy for colds

Deaths from brain-eating amoeba linked to sinus remedy for colds U.S state issues health warning after neti pot is linked to two deaths A model holds a neti pot: It is used to relieve nasal congestion of cold and allergy sufferers A sinus-flushing device used to relieve colds and allergies has been linked to a deadly brain-eating amoeba. Louisiana”s state health department issued a warning about neti pots – which look like mini watering cans, that are used by pouring salty water through one nostril. It follows two recent deaths – a 51-year-old woman and a 20-year-old man from the “brain-eating amoeba” Naegleria fowleri.