Nurse was so incompetent she gave dialysis patient Lucozade instead of glucose drip and couldn"t even take a pulse

Nurse was so incompetent she gave dialysis patient Lucozade instead of glucose drip and couldn't even take a pulseJuleth McKenzie didn't know difference between milligrams and microgramsEleven allegations of errors were either admitted or found provedShe worked at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust By Leon Watson PUBLISHED: 11:39 GMT, 4 January 2013 | UPDATED: 16:11 GMT, 4 January 2013 A nurse trained to grade five standard of care was so incompetent she couldn't even calculate a patient's heart rate, a disciplinary hearing heard.

Asparagus – the trendy vegetable that also "fights diabetes"

Asparagus is latest weapon in the fight against diabetes as study reveals it controls blood sugarHigh doses of asparagus extract had a significant effect on insulin production in tests UK consumption of asparagus is at record levels of around 8,000 tonnes a year<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 17:31 GMT, 21 November 2012 </p> <br> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/21/article-2236322-137AAC1D000005DC-350_233x334.jpg" width="233" height="334" alt="Culinary cure It appears asparagus could have a vital role to play in combating Britains looming diabetes crisis" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Culinary cure It appears asparagus could have a vital role to play in combating Britain's looming diabetes crisis</p> <p>Asparagus could be a powerful new culinary weapon in the fight against diabetes.</p><p>Scientists have found regular intake of the increasingly popular vegetable keeps blood sugar levels under control and boosts the body&#8217;s production of insulin, the hormone that helps it to absorb glucose.</p><p>UK consumption of asparagus has soared in recent years to record levels of around 8,000 tonnes a year.</p><p>As well as its delicate flavour, it now appears it could have a vital role to play in combating Britain&#8217;s looming diabetes crisis.</p><p>Type two diabetes, which accounts for 90 per cent of all diabetes cases, is emerging as a major health burden.</p><p>According to the charity Diabetes UK, at the current rate of increase, the numbers affected will rise from around 2.5 million to four million by 2025 and five million by 2030.</p><p>More than a million people are already affected by the condition but do not realise they have it, perhaps because they do not recognise symptoms, such as fatigue, thirst, frequent urination, recurrent thrush and wounds that are slow to heal.</p><p> </p><p>Left untreated, type two diabetes can raise the risk of heart attacks, blindness and amputation.

Coffee cancer: Six cups a day cuts risk of both womb and prostate cancer

Six cups of coffee a day 'cuts risk of both womb and prostate cancer' | UPDATED: 12:54 GMT, 14 October 2012 The effects were seen regardless of whether regular or decaffeinated coffee was consumed Women who drink four to six cups of coffee a day are less likely to suffer from womb cancer, while men who drink this amount are less likely to suffer prostate cancer, according to a study using 117,000 volunteers.

Black and white cat saves diabetic owner by alerting sleeping husband after she collapses

She's my little hero: Black and white cat saves diabetic owner by alerting sleeping husband after she collapses By Daily Mail PUBLISHED: 16:15 GMT, 13 July 2012 | UPDATED: 16:36 GMT, 13 July 2012 A cat called Charley could scoop a national award after saving the life of her diabetic owner.

Third of diabetic patients victims of medication errors

Third of diabetic patients are victims of medication errors that can cause dangerous blood glucose levels | UPDATED: 23:06 GMT, 16 May 2012 Almost one in three diabetic hospital patients are victims of medication errors that can cause dangerous blood glucose levels, a report has found.

How DAYLIGHT could reduce the risk of having a heart attack

How DAYLIGHT could reduce the risk of having a heart attack Daylight exposure inside hospital could also reduce the damage caused by a heart attack | UPDATED: 15:44 GMT, 26 April 2012 Forget CPR, aspirin and blood clot busters – treating a heart attack victim could be as simple as exposing them to light.

Fat can PREVENT diabetes: Gene that could protect against the condition found in cells

Fat can PREVENT diabetes: Gene found in cells that could protect against the condition | UPDATED: 06:40 GMT, 2 April 2012 'Exciting discovery': Nearly three million people in the UK suffer from diabetes A gene that could help protect against diabetes has been found in fat cells, scientists say.