Fathers-to-be who know the sex of their unborn baby find it easier to bond with him or her

Fathers-to-be who know the sex of their unborn baby find it easier to bond with him or her Men with a name for the baby also find bonding easierThis is because they are better able to imagine named unborn babies as real people they could father Attending scans can also help men feel more connected By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 15:35 GMT, 25 April 2013 | UPDATED: 15:36 GMT, 25 April 2013 Fathers who know the sex of their unborn child and give him or her a name find it easier to bond with their baby.

Retinoblastoma: Tumour discovered after photos revealed "ghostly white reflection" in newborn"s eye

Baby boy diagnosed with SIX eye tumours after photo reveals 'ghostly white reflection' in newborn's eye Parents were taking lots of pictures of their newborn son when they noticed something different Father said: 'Sometimes you get red eye in the photos but this looked almost like a hole in his eye'Little Romero was diagnosed with a big tumour behind his left eye and five smaller ones behind his right eyeChemotherapy and laser treatment have removed the smaller tumours and reduced the big tumour in size | UPDATED: 09:34 GMT, 3 October 2012 Among the dozens of photos that proud parents Curtis and Leonie Norville were taking of their newborn son, one in particular stood out.

Women over 50 "just as likely to suffer from eating disorders as teenagers"

Women over 50 'just as likely to suffer from eating disorders as teenagers'3.5% reported binge eating, while 8% admitted purging62% claimed weight negatively impacted on their lifeOver-75s can still suffer eating problems, study finds | UPDATED: 04:15 GMT, 21 June 2012 They are commonly seen as issues faced predominantly by teenagers and young women.

Schoolgirl aged just ELEVEN among 44 children admitted to one city hospital with anorexia

Schoolgirl aged just ELEVEN among 44 children admitted to one city hospital with anorexia Four boys, aged 13, 14, 15 and 16, and 40 girls, aged between 11 and 18, were treated for eating disorderThey were taken to Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital between January 2007 and December 2011 | UPDATED: 16:28 GMT, 31 May 2012 A schoolgirl aged just 11 was among more than 40 children admitted to a city hospital with anorexia over a five-year period, shock new figures have revealed.