The stomach implant that could combat obesity by reducing hunger pangs

The stomach implant that could combat obesity by reducing hunger pangs New microchip could be alternative to weight-loss surgery, say researchers Attaches to nerve that controls appetite and sends electrical signals to brain These signals reduce the urge to eat and curb appetite, aiding weight loss Trials on humans could start within three years By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 15:45 GMT, 3 April 2013 | UPDATED: 18:57 GMT, 3 April 2013 A microchip implanted in the stomach could be another way to tackle obesity, say scientists.

Breastfeeding for six months "cuts the risk of dying from cancer by 10%"

Breastfeeding for six months 'cuts the risk of dying from cancer by 10%'Six months of breastfeeding your child cuts risk of dying from all cancers Women who breastfeed also 17 per cent less likely to die from a heart attack By Jenny Hope PUBLISHED: 00:38 GMT, 27 March 2013 | UPDATED: 02:17 GMT, 27 March 2013 Safer: A woman who breastfeeds her child is 10 per cent less likely to die from any from of cancer Women who breastfeed for six months reduce their risk of dying from all cancers by 10 per cent, researchers say.

A quarter of people with HIV have no idea they"re infected – and are unwittingly passing it on

A quarter of people with HIV have no idea they're infected – and are unwittingly passing it on These people are responsible for passing on up to 75 per cent of new cases, a leading expert claims Straight men are the least likely to be testedMany people embarrassed to admit they have condition, preventing them from getting appropriate treament By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 00:22 GMT, 14 February 2013 | UPDATED: 08:05 GMT, 14 February 2013 A quarter of people who are HIV positive have no idea they are infected – and pass on up to 75 per cent of new cases, research shows.

Child hospital admissions for asthma slump after smoking ban

Child hospital admissions for asthma slump after smoking ban Hospital admissions for child asthma attacks fell by 12.3% in first year after 2007 smoking ban in EnglandExperts say law change may have made adults more aware of dangers of passive smoking By Jenny Hope PUBLISHED: 17:19 GMT, 21 January 2013 | UPDATED: 23:58 GMT, 21 January 2013 The number of children being admitted to hospital to be treated for asthma attacks has dropped sharply since the smoking ban came into effect.

How fighting HIV with HIV "could be a cure for AIDS"

How turning HIV against itself 'could provide a cure for AIDS' Technique modifies a protein in the virus to that is provides protection from infection 'It is like fighting fire with fire,' says lead researcherHIV could remain latent in body and not lead to AIDS By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 14:02 GMT, 18 January 2013 | UPDATED: 14:02 GMT, 18 January 2013 HIV has been turned against itself in the laboratory in a breakthrough that could permanently quash the virus that leads to AIDS, say scientists.

Xenon: "Miracle" gas gives hope to babies brain-damaged at birth

'Miracle' gas gives hope to babies brain-damaged at birthBirth asphyxia occurs in one or two out of 1,000 deliveries in developed countries | UPDATED: 05:19 GMT, 2 December 2012 A ‘miracle’ gas that occurs naturally in the air could help reduce incidence of brain damage in newborns.

Formula that could predict your baby"s chances of growing into a fat child

Formula could predict your baby's chances of growing into a fat child | UPDATED: 01:56 GMT, 29 November 2012 The two-minute test predicts if a newborn baby is going to grow into an obese child At one of the happiest times of their life, it may not be what a parent wants to hear.

Hospital death rate surges at weekends with some patients up to 42% more likely to die

Hospital patients 'up to 42% more likely to die' if admitted at weekends Patients with liver disease or heart disease most at risk Aortic aneurism and stroke victims also did badly Statistics blamed on fewer staff on duty and fewer scans carried out at weekends | UPDATED: 16:03 GMT, 16 October 2012 Critically-ill patients are up to 42 per cent more likely to die in hospital if they are admitted at weekends, it has emerged.

The jab that can trick the heart to heal itself

Jab that can trick the heart into healing itself could be given to coronary victims in back of ambulances | UPDATED: 22:55 GMT, 23 September 2012 A jab that allows damaged hearts to mend themselves and could be given by paramedics in the back of ambulances is being developed at a British university.