The great class health divide is widening as better-off shun bad habits, reveals thinktank

The great class health divide is widening as better-off shun bad habits, reveals thinktank | UPDATED: 13:00 GMT, 23 August 2012 Smoking: People who are economically worse off are less likely to give up bad habits, according to research People who are economically better-off are increasingly shunning unhealthy habits such as smoking and binge drinking, new research has revealed.

Stillbirths twice as common among women in deprived areas compared to richer neighbours

Women living in deprived areas twice as likely to have a stillbirth as richer neighbours | UPDATED: 08:49 GMT, 26 June 2012 Twice as many babies are stillborn in the most deprived 10 per cent of the country compared to the wealthiest, researchers have found.

Expect six fewer disability-free years if you live in the North

Why living in the North means you’re more likely to have an illness-ridden retirement | UPDATED: 08:40 GMT, 14 June 2012 The report said health inequalities have enormous social and economic costs A rich-poor divide in England means people living in the North-East are less likely to enjoy a healthy retirement than those in the South East, figures show.

Cancer sufferers prescribed nearly 10,000 treatments denied to them by NHS through special fund

Cancer sufferers prescribed nearly 10,000 treatments through special fund after NHS said they weren't 'cost effective' Cancer sufferers have been prescribed nearly 10,000 treatments denied to them by the NHS through a temporary fund.

Women pop to the doctor more than men "because they really ARE the sicker sex"

Women pop to the doctor more often than men “because they really ARE the sicker sex” It is common knowledge that women dash to the doctor when they fall ill while men drag their feet. But this assumption has been undermined by a study that found women may report more illnesses because they actually are sick more often. Scientists led by Davide Malmusi, of the Public Health Agency of Barcelona, found women did report health problems more often.