Walking "is better than the gym": Long periods of gentle exercise are more beneficial than a high-intensity workout

Walking 'is better than the gym': Long periods of gentle exercise are more beneficial than a high-intensity workoutLow intensity exercise improves insulin sensitivity and blood lipid levels, which are indicators of diabetes and obesity By Jaymi Mccann PUBLISHED: 21:57 GMT, 13 February 2013 | UPDATED: 01:22 GMT, 14 February 2013 If you have just been to the gym, don't sit down, not for too long anyway.

Why rest is as crucial as exercise in keeping fit: Breaks allow muscles to recover and makes the body get fitter faster

Why rest is as crucial as exercise in keeping fit: Breaks allow muscles to recover and makes the body get fitter fasterWorking rest periods into exercise sessions makes you fitter, fasterSport scientists undertook study with cyclists By Fiona Macrae PUBLISHED: 23:55 GMT, 17 January 2013 | UPDATED: 00:05 GMT, 18 January 2013 Relax: Periods of relaxation can help exercise enthusiasts get fitter, faster If your resolution to exercise more is leaving you tired out, put your feet up.

Man stops shaking for first time in 15 years after brain zapped with ultrasound in pioneering surgery-free treatment

Man's hands stop shaking for first time in 15 years after doctors zap his brain with pioneering ultrasound treatment Doctors used MRI scans to find rogue brain cells causing the tremorUltrasound killed cells by heating them Patient was awake and aware throughout the five-hour procedure and didn't need anaestheticExperts say it could help patients with other conditions such as Parkinson's or brain tumours | UPDATED: 16:45 GMT, 19 December 2012 A man whose hands shook so violently he struggled to eat and drink has undergone a pioneering treatment to ease his tremor.

Doing the garden or going for a walk is better for your health than relying on statins, study says

Doing the garden or going for a walk is better for your health than relying on statins, study saysBeing physically fit reduces the risk of dying by two-thirds, US research says But combining statins with better fitness may improve survival rates still further | UPDATED: 08:40 GMT, 28 November 2012 Findings from US research suggest that doing more walking and gardening could help individuals with high cholesterol as much, if not more, than drugs Unfit people with high cholesterol levels would be better off gardening or going for a walk than taking pills, says a study.

Swotting "is bad for girls": "Too much studying damages health and increases risk bone disease"

Swotting 'is bad for girls': 'Too much studying damages health and increases risk bone disease'<br>British research found link to long periods spent at desks studying and low bone density in girlsFor boys, the link was traced to 'internet leisure time' and playing computer games<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 23:51 GMT, 24 November 2012 </p> <br> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/20/article-2235651-0226CFEA000004B0-651_306x423.jpg" width="306" height="423" alt="In newly published research, scientists have claimed long revision sessions spent at desks and on the internet could be bad for teenaged bones" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">In newly published research, scientists have claimed long revision sessions spent at desks and on the internet could be bad for teenaged bones</p> <p>It might sound like one of the many excuses touted by teenagers eager to dodge homework duties, but it seems studying too long and hard could actually be bad for their health.

Even a brisk daily walk can cut the risk of breast cancer

Even a brisk daily walk can cut the risk of breast cancer Women who exercised for at least 90 minutes a day saw the most benefit with a 30 per cent drop in their breast cancer risk | UPDATED: 13:01 GMT, 25 June 2012 Women saw a reduction in their breast cancer risk no matter how intense the exercise.

Daily Chores And Exercise Could Help Ward Off Alzheimer’s, Study Suggests

Who knew something as simple as washing the dishes could help to ward off Alzheimer’s?