The simple solution to screen fatigue: Scientists say 20 seconds of BLINKING can stop computer users getting eye strain

The simple solution to screen fatigue: Scientists say 20 seconds of BLINKING can stop computer users getting eye strain By Mark Prigg PUBLISHED: 19:42 GMT, 13 March 2013 | UPDATED: 09:09 GMT, 14 March 2013 Researchers have come up with a simple exercise they claim could stop computer users getting eye strain.

Feeling peckish? SKIPPING can banish your hunger pangs by making you feel full up

Feeling peckish How skipping can banish hunger by making you feel full upRapid up and down movement disturbs the gut and interferes with the release of hunger hormonesWeight-bearing exercise such as skipping is better at reducing appetite than other forms such as cycling By Pat Hagan PUBLISHED: 12:40 GMT, 20 February 2013 | UPDATED: 13:00 GMT, 20 February 2013 It brings a whole new meaning to the expression 'skipping meals'.

Radio 2 DJ Jo Whiley: "I"ve never done a fad diet, but I watch what I eat"

'I've never done a fad diet, but I watch what I eat': Under the microscope with Jo Whiley | UPDATED: 00:15 GMT, 11 December 2012 The Radio 2 DJ, 47, on existing without much sleep, having a high pain threshold and why she won't be having plastic surgery 'I often eat on the go, so it's (diet) not as healthy as it should be,' said Jo Whiley ANY FAMILY AILMENTS Rheumatoid arthritis — my dad is badly affected by stiff, painful joints, and my mum and grandmother also have it.

The new MRI scanner that won"t give you claustrophobia

The new MRI scanner that won't give you claustrophobia | UPDATED: 01:09 GMT, 27 November 2012 Every day, hundreds of patients undergo magnetic resonance imaging scans (MRI scans) — and every day many of those patients will ask to get out of the machine before doctors have even had time to take the scan.

Kate Lawson: Arthritis sufferer offers tips for cooking with crippling condition

Ready, Steady, Grip: How one arthritis sufferer conquered the kitchen in spite of her crippling condition | UPDATED: 21:29 GMT, 22 September 2012 Keen cooks may aspire to chop raw ingredients with the same speed and precision as Britain’s most famous TV chefs, but for many arthritis sufferers, doing so at less than half a professional’s pace can be a gruelling challenge.