Mini marathons: Tireless toddlers cover more than two and a half miles a day (but that includes 102 falls)

Mini marathons: Tireless toddlers cover more than two and a half miles a day (but that includes 102 falls)If the average toddler is active half of their waking time, they will clock up 2.6 miles a dayResearchers filmed over 130 infants as they explored specially-designed playroomAnalysis showed those who walked clocked up 2,368 steps an hour, covering 0.44 miles<br> <p> By Daily Mail Reporter</p> <p> <strong>PUBLISHED:</strong> 00:45 GMT, 23 November 2012 | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 10:56 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <br> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/23/article-0-03FA9A9C0000044D-253_233x475.jpg" width="233" height="475" alt="Tireless toddlers: The average toddler walks more than 2.5miles a day" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Tireless toddlers: The average toddler walks more than 2.5miles a day</p> <p>They may be called baby steps but don&#8217;t be fooled: the average toddler walks more than two and a half miles a day.</p><p>The distance – which would put many adults to shame – is made of 14,208 steps.</p><p>Perhaps less surprisingly, it also includes 102 falls.</p><p>To come up with the figures, the New York University researchers videoed more than 130 infants aged between 12 and 19 months as they explored a specially-designed playroom.</p><p>Another 15 were taped at home.</p><p>Some were &#8216;expert crawlers&#8217; who had yet to start to walk.

Brenda Blethyn: "I don"t see the point of having those big inflated lips"

'I don't see the point of having those big inflated lips': Under the microscope with Brenda Blethyn | UPDATED: 00:53 GMT, 24 July 2012 The actress, 66, on why she's a happy person, her ability to fall asleep anywhere and how brisk walking helps her keep in shape 'I'm only 5ft 2in and I could be lighter,' said Brenda Blethyn ANY FAMILY AILMENTS My mum died in 1992 of a heart attack aged 88, as did one of her sisters.

Marathon man: Former Navy sailor runs two marathons every day for 50 DAYS (and claims he"s sad to be finishing)

Man on a mission: Former Navy sailor runs two marathons every day for 50 DAYS (and claims he's sad to be finishing) 29-year-old has performed 50mile runs around Britain's coastline | UPDATED: 16:09 GMT, 25 May 2012 As Britain continues to bask in the summer sunshine most people will find time to enjoy the balmy weather.

Marathon man

Man on a mission: Former Navy sailor runs two marathons every day for 50 DAYS for soldier's charity 29-year-old has performed 50mile runs around Britain's coastline | UPDATED: 13:27 GMT, 25 May 2012 As Britain continues to bask in the summer sunshine most people will find time to enjoy the balmy weather.

Undearm implant that jump-starts an irregular heart

Undearm implant that jump-starts an irregular heart | UPDATED: 01:05 GMT, 15 May 2012 Tragedy: Runner Claire Squires died during last month's London Marathon A million Britons suffer from an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia, and every year 70,000 die as a result.

Living life to the full with a new heart: Patient keeps his moving promise to anonymous donor"s family by parachuting, surfing, snowboarding and…

Living life to the full with a new heart: Patient keeps his moving promise to anonymous donor's family by parachuting, surfing, snowboarding and playing rugby | UPDATED: 11:49 GMT, 21 March 2012 After receiving a life saving heart transplant thanks to an anonymous donor, patient Joe Matthews pledged to live life to the full for both of them.

John Motson: "The thought of the next football match is usually enough to keep me cheerful"

“The thought of the next football match is usually enough to keep me cheerful”: Under the microscope with John Motson The 66-year-old veteran Match Of The Day commentator on how he has avoided depression and why he puts on weight during the football season

Running marathons "could permanently damage the heart"

Running marathons “could permanently damage the heart”High-endurance activities can scar right ventricleIncreased risk of reduced performance – a cardiac “over-training” syndrome – or arrhythmia Marathon runners such as Paula Radcliffe could be at risk of permanent heart damage Running marathons could cause permanent heart damage, say scientists. A study found that high-endurance activities can lead to scarring of the right ventricle, increasing the risk of health complications