Scandal-hit Mid-Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust to be put into administration

Scandal-hit Mid-Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust to be put into administration Includes Stafford Hospital, where 1,200 patients may have died needlesslyDecision has been made by Monitor, which regulates foundation trustsDone to 'safeguard the future of health services' provided by the trust By Sophie Borland PUBLISHED: 14:19 GMT, 15 April 2013 | UPDATED: 00:19 GMT, 16 April 2013 The hospital trust at the centre of one of the worst health scandals in living memory has been put into administration after losing 20million last year.

Children who get a good night"s sleep "have better memories"

Children who get a good night's sleep 'have better memories' The findings could explain why children who do not sleep well do not do as well at schoolResearchers found that children were more effective at converting 'implicit' knowledge into 'explicit' than adults after a good night's sleep By Alex Ward PUBLISHED: 18:33 GMT, 24 February 2013 | UPDATED: 08:35 GMT, 25 February 2013 Sleep tight: Researchers found that children who slept well had a boosted memory which could explain why children who do not sleep well do not do as well in school Children who get a good night’s sleep have a boosted memory according to new research.

Lack of deep sleep in old age "can contribute significantly to memory loss"

Lack of deep sleep in old age 'can contribute significantly to memory loss'People in their 70s did worse in a memory test than those in their 20s, even though they had same hours of restMonitoring showed quality of sleep enjoyed by older people up to 75 per cent worseResearchers suggest by stimulating deeper sleep, it may be possible to boost memory maintenance in the elderly By Nick Mcdermott PUBLISHED: 20:44 GMT, 27 January 2013 | UPDATED: 20:44 GMT, 27 January 2013 A lack of deep restorative sleep in older people significantly contributes to memory loss, a new study has found.

Does the menopause really make you forgetful? Yes, but not for long, say scientists

Does the menopause really make you forgetful Yes, but only for the first year Memory loss is worse in the year after the last periodBut is likely to only be temporary, say experts Symptoms such as changing hormone levels, sleep problems and anxiety are not linked to cognitive decline PUBLISHED: 16:16 GMT, 3 January 2013 | UPDATED: 16:18 GMT, 3 January 2013 Memory loss: Experts say that forgetfulness is most common in the year after a woman's last period If you blame losing your house keys on the menopause making you forgetful, you might be onto something.

Looking for a morning boost? Forget coffee – green tea holds the key

Looking for a morning brain boost Forget coffee – green tea holds the key for menResearch has shown it can help improve memory and cognition in menGreen tea is full of polyphenols, which widen blood vessels, speeding the supply of blood to the brain | UPDATED: 09:23 GMT, 28 November 2012 Looking for a quick brain pick me up before work Forget coffee – it seems green tea has the key.

Missing just two hours of sleep can erase memories for ever

Yet ANOTHER reason why sleep is so vital – missing even two hours a night can erase memories for ever Just two hours of missed sleep is enough to stop the brain from laying down and storing memoriesReplay of our memories while we are asleep is essential for their proper storage in the brain | UPDATED: 17:16 GMT, 16 October 2012 If you sleep badly tonight, you may have no recollection of reading this tomorrow.

Drinking a litre a day of mineral water "can prevent onset of Alzheimer"s" by flushing out aluminium

Drinking a litre of mineral water every day 'can prevent Alzheimer's memory loss' Silicon-rich mineral water can help remove aluminium which is linked to dementia | UPDATED: 13:25 GMT, 12 October 2012 Drinking a litre of mineral water every day can prevent cognitive decline in Alzheimer's sufferers by removing aluminium from their bodies, a study found yesterday.

Growing up in the countryside could double the risk of Alzheimers

Growing up in the countryside could DOUBLE the risk of Alzheimer’sPeople raised in rural areas rather than those who moved there later in life faced the greatest risk of brain wasting disease Cause is currently unclear but may be linked to access to healthcare or even exposure to some unknown substance Alzheimer's affects an estimated 820,000 people in Britain and the number is expected to more than double in the next 40 years | UPDATED: 11:35 GMT, 18 September 2012 Being brought up in the countryside could double the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, according to new British research.

Non-smokers regularly exposed to second-hand smoke are "at risk of damaging their memory"

Non-smokers regularly exposed to second-hand smoke are 'at risk of damaging their memory'Scientists found non-smokers exposed to second-hand smoke forgot almost 20% more than non-smokers who were not exposedBoth groups out-performed smokers who forgot 30% more than those who were not exposed to second-hand smoke | UPDATED: 14:51 GMT, 13 September 2012 We all know cigarettes are bad for our health, but researchers now claim that non-smokers who are regularly exposed to second-hand smoke are at risk of damaging their memory.

How green tea boost your brain

Green tea isn't just good for your heart, it's good for your brain too Study found that chemical properties of green tea promotes the generation of brain cells | UPDATED: 14:17 GMT, 6 September 2012 The green tea chemical ECGC was found to boost the generation of brain cells in mice, which seemed to improve memory and learning in mice Sipping green tea is not just good for you heart – it could boost the memory as well, say researchers.