The stomach implant that could combat obesity by reducing hunger pangs

The stomach implant that could combat obesity by reducing hunger pangs New microchip could be alternative to weight-loss surgery, say researchers Attaches to nerve that controls appetite and sends electrical signals to brain These signals reduce the urge to eat and curb appetite, aiding weight loss Trials on humans could start within three years By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 15:45 GMT, 3 April 2013 | UPDATED: 18:57 GMT, 3 April 2013 A microchip implanted in the stomach could be another way to tackle obesity, say scientists.

The "eye-borg": First successful implant of a "bionic" eye could restore sight to the blind

'I've dreamed in colour for the first time in 20 years': Blind British man can see again after first successful implant of 'bionic' eye microchipsMicrochips restore sight to people suffering retinitis pigmentosa – an incurable condition that leads to blindnessCondition affects one in every 3,000-4,000 peopleClinical trial with two sufferers 'exceeds expectations' Sufferers able to detect outlines of objects 'within days' Vision expected to improve further as 3mm chip 'beds in' | UPDATED: 23:17 GMT, 3 May 2012 Surgeons in Oxford, led by Professor Robert MacLaren, fitted the chip at the back of Chris' eye in a complex eight-hour operation last month.

Helius intelligent medicine: High Street pharmacy offers pills with edible microchips to help doctors monitor patients" health

Medicine of the future arrives on High Street as pharmacy offers pills with edible microchips to help doctors monitor patients' health An edible microchip will be included with each group of a patient's pills A patch on the skin will pick up a signal once it's swallowed and relay this to a smart phone The system will be offered to patients taking medication for heart conditions and diabetes 'Intelligent' pills that will help patients and their doctors to keep track of their medication regimes, are to go on sale in the UK. Lloyds Pharmacy has signed a deal with the U.S company Proteus Biomedical to sell medication tagged with edible sensors that are the size of a grain of sand.