Hundreds of girls aged 14 or under are having "designer vagina" surgery on the NHS

Hundreds of girls aged 14 or under are having 'designer vagina' surgery on the NHS343 operations performed on under 14s in six yearsResearchers want an age limit for the surgery <br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 11:48 GMT, 22 November 2012 </p> <br> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2236675-0E99A88200000578-652_233x423.jpg" width="233" height="423" alt="Trend: Hundreds of girls are having designer vagina surgery on the NHS, say researchers" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Trend: Hundreds of girls are having 'designer vagina' surgery on the NHS, say researchers</p> <p>Hundreds of young girls are having &#8216;designer vagina&#8217; surgery on the NHS, say researchers.</p><p>Figures show 343 operations were performed on girls aged 14 or under in the last six years, possibly for cosmetic reasons.</p><p>The procedures involve reshaping female genitalia and requests may be granted on the grounds that the problem is psychologically damaging.</p><p>Researchers from University College Hospital, London, led by Dr Sarah Creighton, claim it is &#8216;disturbing&#8217; that there is no minimum age limit for the surgery.</p><p>They say demand may be growing for such procedures because of poor and inaccurate information available on the internet, usually from private clinics.</p><p>Websites of companies that provide female genital cosmetic surgery (FGCS) make &#8216;unsubstantiated claims&#8217; about the benefits of the procedures.</p><p>They also use confusing terminology and do not highlight surgical risks, according to the research published in BMJ Open.</p><p>A survey of 10 websites found little information was given on short-term or long-term surgical risks either from individual clinics and their surgeons or from the medical literature.</p><p>&#8216;'Unsubstantiated claims of physical, psychological and sexual benefits were present on every website&#8217; said consultant gynaecologist Dr Creighton.</p><p> </p><p>'The absence of a lower age limit for any of the FGCS procedures is most disturbing of all&#8217; she said.</p><p>Labiaplasties, which are operations to reshape the labia, the inner lips of the vagina, have become increasingly common, often because women are dissatisfied with their appearance.</p><p>Dr Creighton said her research cannot confirm whether some girls are having medically unnecessary surgery.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2236675-13468497000005DC-547_468x528.jpg" width="468" height="528" alt="Worried: Researchers from University College Hospital, London, led by Dr Sarah Creighton, claim it is disturbing that there is not a lower age limit for the surgery" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Worried: Researchers from University College Hospital, London, led by Dr Sarah Creighton, claim it is 'disturbing' that there is not a lower age limit for the surgery</p> <p>She said &#8216;In the past six years, 343 labiaplasties were performed in the UK NHS on girls aged 14 or under.

Let"s (not) Get It On: Having sex WON"T jump-start labour, couples told

Let's (not) Get It On: Having sex WON'T jump-start labour, couples toldNo differences found in the timing of delivery between women who had sex near term and those who abstainedHowever, study did confirm sex is usually safe late on in pregnancy<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 15:19 GMT, 22 November 2012 </p> <p>Pregnant women who are keen to jump-start their contractions have long relied on traditional remedies from eating hot curries to having sex.</p><p>But now scientists have some disappointing news for couples – making love doesn't bring on labour.</p><p>A study from the University of Malaya in Malaysia found no differences in the timing of delivery between women who had sex near term and those who abstained.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2236760-16295900000005DC-891_468x309.jpg" width="468" height="309" alt="Waiting: In one Friends episode Ross and Rachel decide to have sex to try and jump-start labour" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Waiting: In one Friends episode Ross and Rachel decide to have sex to try and jump-start labour.

Boy who can"t leave house without oxygen can now enjoy running with his dog thanks to specially-made backpack

Boy who can't leave house without oxygen can now enjoy running with his dog thanks to specially-made backpack <br> Lenny's original bag was designed to be used by older patients and restricted his movement as it was far too large for himA design student came up with an effective solution after a local hospital contacted a firm she was interning withThe new bag doesn't sway from side to side, allowing him to run<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 17:13 GMT, 22 November 2012 </p> <p>A young boy with a rare lung disease has run around with his pet dog for the first time, after a student designed a lightweight backpack for his vital oxygen supply.</p><p>Lenny Yule, 11, from Linwood, Renfrewshire, has interstitial lung disease which has scarred his organs.

Flu jabs are a "waste of taxpayer"s money", claim scientists who the benefits have been over-hyped

Flu jabs are a 'waste of taxpayers' money', claim scientists who say the benefits have been over-hyped<br> University of Minnesota report says benefits – especially for older people – have been over-promoted <br>New vaccine pipeline hindered as a result <br>But experts still recommend current vaccination 'as it's the best we have' <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 18:57 GMT, 22 November 2012 </p> <br><p>The benefits of the annual flu jab have been &#8216;over-hyped&#8217;, scientists claim.</p><p>They say the vaccine is far less effective than is widely believed, with some studies showing it protects less than two-thirds of the population.</p><p>The US researchers say ministers in Britain as well as America are &#8216;wasting taxpayers&#8217; money&#8217; on the jab.</p><p>And they claim that because the benefits have been so &#8216;over-promoted&#8217;, scientists have been deterred from inventing vaccines that would be far more effective.<br></p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/21/article-2236253-16257656000005DC-198_468x286.jpg" width="468" height="286" alt="Flu jabs are a waste of taxpayer's money due to the protective effects of the vaccine being over-hyped, it has been claimed" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Flu jabs are a waste of taxpayer's money due to the protective effects of the vaccine being over-hyped, it has been claimed</p> TODAY'S POLL <p>Is the flu jab a waste of taxpayers' money</p> Yes No VOTE <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix//2012/11/22/article-999-16257656000005DC-830_108x76.jpg" width="108" height="76" alt="Flu Jab" /> POLL RESULTS Close All polls Click to view yesterday's poll results DM.has("rcp", "poll", { pollId: '1033334', channelId: '1', questionId: '' }); <p>But the Department of Health has insisted the flu jabs &#8216;save lives&#8217; and urged the elderly and patients with long-term conditions to come forward for their vaccinations.</p> <p>Researchers from the University of Minnesota looked at 12,000 studies on the effectiveness and safety of the flu jab, going back to the 1930s.

Hating your job is as bad for your health as being unemployed, researchers warn

Hating your job is as bad for your health as being unemployed, researchers warn A demanding job, nasty boss and poor job security are as bad for your mental health as being out of workOnly those who enjoy their jobs fare betterAlso linked to increased risk of heart disease<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 12:50 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <p>Having a job you hate is as bad for your mental health as being unemployed, Australian researchers have claimed.</p><p>They say that people with poor working conditions suffer just as much as those out of work.<br></p><p>And they weren&#8217;t just referring to a dusty factory or dimly lit office, but psychological factors such as a demanding job, nasty boss and poor job security.

The kitchen sponge is 200,000 times dirtier than a toilet seat – and could even lead to PARALYSIS

The kitchen sponge is 200,000 times dirtier than a toilet seat – and could even lead to PARALYSISThere are 10million bacteria per square inch of a kitchen sponge and 1m per square inch on a dish clothBacteria found on them can cause Guillain-Barre syndrome, which can lead to loss of movement <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 14:32 GMT, 20 November 2012 </p> <p>It may come as a surprise to the houseproud and 'clean freaks' among us but the kitchen sponge is one of the dirtiest places in the home – 200,000 times dirtier than a toilet seat.

Unsupervised children having more accidents because parents are too busy playing on their smartphones

Playground children having more accidents because parents are too busy playing on their smartphones Number of children admitted to hospital after playground falls has risen by a third in five yearsExperts blame the sharp rise on parents being distracted by text messages and emails Children also more inclined to take risks or misbehave when they know their parents&#8217; attention is diverted <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 17:33 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/23/article-2237034-1263F290000005DC-293_233x423.jpg" width="233" height="423" alt="Children are having more accidents in playgrounds because their parents are too busy checking their smartphones to look after them properly (picture posed by model)" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Children are having more accidents in playgrounds because their parents are too busy checking their smartphones to look after them properly (picture posed by model)</p> <p>Children are having more accidents because their parents are too busy checking their mobile phones to supervise them properly, researchers warn.</p><p>They blame a sharp rise in playground falls and mishaps in the home on their mothers or fathers being distracted by text messages and emails.<br></p><p>The number of children being admitted to hospital having fallen from playground equipment has risen by a third in the last five years, according to NHS data.</p><p>Parenting experts and doctors specialising in emergency departments believe the rise is partly fuelled by the growing use of smartphones and BlackBerries.</p><p>They also point out children are more inclined to take risks or misbehave when they know their parents&#8217; attention is diverted.</p><p>Figures from the NHS show that last year some 9,564 children were admitted to hospital having fallen from playground equipment, up from 7,232 in 2006/7.</p> <p>Researchers point out that this rise coincided with the increasing availability of BlackBerrys and smartphones, such as Apple&#8217;s iPhone, which went on the market five years ago.