Boy who can"t leave house without oxygen can now enjoy running with his dog thanks to specially-made backpack

Boy who can't leave house without oxygen can now enjoy running with his dog thanks to specially-made backpack <br> Lenny's original bag was designed to be used by older patients and restricted his movement as it was far too large for himA design student came up with an effective solution after a local hospital contacted a firm she was interning withThe new bag doesn't sway from side to side, allowing him to run<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 17:13 GMT, 22 November 2012 </p> <p>A young boy with a rare lung disease has run around with his pet dog for the first time, after a student designed a lightweight backpack for his vital oxygen supply.</p><p>Lenny Yule, 11, from Linwood, Renfrewshire, has interstitial lung disease which has scarred his organs.

Flu jabs are a "waste of taxpayer"s money", claim scientists who the benefits have been over-hyped

Flu jabs are a 'waste of taxpayers' money', claim scientists who say the benefits have been over-hyped<br> University of Minnesota report says benefits – especially for older people – have been over-promoted <br>New vaccine pipeline hindered as a result <br>But experts still recommend current vaccination 'as it's the best we have' <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 18:57 GMT, 22 November 2012 </p> <br><p>The benefits of the annual flu jab have been &#8216;over-hyped&#8217;, scientists claim.</p><p>They say the vaccine is far less effective than is widely believed, with some studies showing it protects less than two-thirds of the population.</p><p>The US researchers say ministers in Britain as well as America are &#8216;wasting taxpayers&#8217; money&#8217; on the jab.</p><p>And they claim that because the benefits have been so &#8216;over-promoted&#8217;, scientists have been deterred from inventing vaccines that would be far more effective.<br></p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/21/article-2236253-16257656000005DC-198_468x286.jpg" width="468" height="286" alt="Flu jabs are a waste of taxpayer's money due to the protective effects of the vaccine being over-hyped, it has been claimed" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Flu jabs are a waste of taxpayer's money due to the protective effects of the vaccine being over-hyped, it has been claimed</p> TODAY'S POLL <p>Is the flu jab a waste of taxpayers' money</p> Yes No VOTE <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix//2012/11/22/article-999-16257656000005DC-830_108x76.jpg" width="108" height="76" alt="Flu Jab" /> POLL RESULTS Close All polls Click to view yesterday's poll results DM.has("rcp", "poll", { pollId: '1033334', channelId: '1', questionId: '' }); <p>But the Department of Health has insisted the flu jabs &#8216;save lives&#8217; and urged the elderly and patients with long-term conditions to come forward for their vaccinations.</p> <p>Researchers from the University of Minnesota looked at 12,000 studies on the effectiveness and safety of the flu jab, going back to the 1930s.

Hating your job is as bad for your health as being unemployed, researchers warn

Hating your job is as bad for your health as being unemployed, researchers warn A demanding job, nasty boss and poor job security are as bad for your mental health as being out of workOnly those who enjoy their jobs fare betterAlso linked to increased risk of heart disease<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 12:50 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <p>Having a job you hate is as bad for your mental health as being unemployed, Australian researchers have claimed.</p><p>They say that people with poor working conditions suffer just as much as those out of work.<br></p><p>And they weren&#8217;t just referring to a dusty factory or dimly lit office, but psychological factors such as a demanding job, nasty boss and poor job security.

Unsupervised children having more accidents because parents are too busy playing on their smartphones

Playground children having more accidents because parents are too busy playing on their smartphones Number of children admitted to hospital after playground falls has risen by a third in five yearsExperts blame the sharp rise on parents being distracted by text messages and emails Children also more inclined to take risks or misbehave when they know their parents&#8217; attention is diverted <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 17:33 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/23/article-2237034-1263F290000005DC-293_233x423.jpg" width="233" height="423" alt="Children are having more accidents in playgrounds because their parents are too busy checking their smartphones to look after them properly (picture posed by model)" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Children are having more accidents in playgrounds because their parents are too busy checking their smartphones to look after them properly (picture posed by model)</p> <p>Children are having more accidents because their parents are too busy checking their mobile phones to supervise them properly, researchers warn.</p><p>They blame a sharp rise in playground falls and mishaps in the home on their mothers or fathers being distracted by text messages and emails.<br></p><p>The number of children being admitted to hospital having fallen from playground equipment has risen by a third in the last five years, according to NHS data.</p><p>Parenting experts and doctors specialising in emergency departments believe the rise is partly fuelled by the growing use of smartphones and BlackBerries.</p><p>They also point out children are more inclined to take risks or misbehave when they know their parents&#8217; attention is diverted.</p><p>Figures from the NHS show that last year some 9,564 children were admitted to hospital having fallen from playground equipment, up from 7,232 in 2006/7.</p> <p>Researchers point out that this rise coincided with the increasing availability of BlackBerrys and smartphones, such as Apple&#8217;s iPhone, which went on the market five years ago.

Luck? No, it was fabulous first aid that saved my life, says footballer Fabrice Muamba as he praises heroes at first aid awards

Luck No, it was fabulous first aid that saved my life, says footballer Fabrice Muamba as he praises medics who brought him back from the brink of deathBolton Wanderers player was only given a five per cent chance to surviveFabrice Muamba has made a full recovery and thanks the emergency service staff's swift action <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 22:17 GMT, 24 November 2012 </p> <br><p>Of all people, one would expect Fabrice Muamba to believe in the power of luck.

The kitchen sponge is 200,000 times dirtier than a toilet seat – and could even lead to PARALYSIS

The kitchen sponge is 200,000 times dirtier than a toilet seat – and could even lead to PARALYSISThere are 10million bacteria per square inch of a kitchen sponge and 1m per square inch on a dish clothBacteria found on them can cause Guillain-Barre syndrome, which can lead to loss of movement <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 14:32 GMT, 20 November 2012 </p> <p>It may come as a surprise to the houseproud and 'clean freaks' among us but the kitchen sponge is one of the dirtiest places in the home – 200,000 times dirtier than a toilet seat.

Doctors withholding treatment from dying cancer patients because they think it is "futile"

Doctors 'are withholding treatment from dying cancer patients because they think it is futile to continue'<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 10:14 GMT, 21 November 2012 </p> <br> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/21/article-2236148-028B4207000005DC-10_233x423.jpg" width="233" height="423" alt="Shocking: Doctors are withholding treatment from dying cancer patients because they do not think it worthwhile, a report warns" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Shocking: Doctors are withholding treatment from dying cancer patients because they do not think it worthwhile, a report warns.

Muscular boys will "live longer than their weaker friends", a new study claims

Muscly boys aren't just a hit with the girls – they live longer, too Researchers tracked more than one million Swedish male adolescents over 24 yearsThey found stronger boys lived longer, even if they became overweight adultsPhysically weaker people might be more mentally vulnerable, it was suggested<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 11:05 GMT, 21 November 2012 </p> <br><p>After a summer witnessing crowds of screaming girls jostling to catch a glimpse of Olympic diver Tod Daley's toned torso, there can't have been many young men who didn't feel a twinge of jealousy.