For Caden: The classmates of brave meningitis victim, 6, hoping for a Christmas number one in his name

For Caden: The classmates of brave meningitis victim, 6, hoping for a Christmas number one in his nameA rendition of Oh Holy Night by Ladywell Primary School was recorded in honour of classmate Caden BegganThe little boy died after a four week battle with meningitisThe song has already been downloaded 10,000 times and peaked at number nine in the download charts He won a legion of worldwide fans online after parents shared his plight on Facebook | UPDATED: 19:31 GMT, 3 December 2012 The classmates of a six-year old boy who died after contracting meningitis could be on track for a Christmas number one in his name.

Giving criminals with ADHD medication could stop them from re-offending, say experts

Giving criminals with ADHD medication could stop them from re-offending, say expertsAround four per cent of children in the UK and half as many adults are believed to suffer from ADHDCriminal behaviour in those with the disorder falls by about 30% when they are on medication, research shows <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 07:52 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <p>Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending, a study suggests.</p><p>Criminal behaviour in people diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) falls by about a third when they are on medication, the research shows.</p><p>Translated to the prison population, similar treatment could have a dramatic effect, experts believe.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2237015-020D956F000004B0-159_468x406.jpg" width="468" height="406" alt="Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending</p> <p>Around four per cent of children in the UK and half as many adults are believed to suffer from the disorder, which is characterised by over-activity, impulsivity, aggression, short temper and disorganised thinking.</p><p>But a disproportionate number of people with ADHD end up being convicted of petty crimes, often related to violence and drug abuse.</p><p> </p><p>Studies suggest that anything from 10 per cent to 40 per cent of prison inmates have the disorder, but few are diagnosed or treated.</p><p>Treating ADHD-affected children with drugs such as the stimulant Ritalin is controversial because of the side effects, which can include nervous system disturbances and raised blood pressure and heart rate.</p>CONTROVERSIAL STUDY<br><p>The research was conducted in Sweden, where it is easy to access data on medical treatments and criminal convictions through national registries.</p><p>Scientists studied the records of more than 25,000 individuals with ADHD, mostly teenagers and young adults.</p><p>They found that over a period of four years, 37 per cent of the men and 15 per cent of the women were convicted of crimes, compared with a rate in the general population of 9 per cent and 2 per cent.</p><p>Drug treatment for ADHD was associated with a 32 per cent drop in offending rates by men and 41 per cent by women – an overall reduction of about a third.</p> <p>But the study authors say such drugs could have a real impact on crime, although their use would have to be carefully considered on a case-by-case basis.</p><p>The findings are published in the New England Journal of Medicine.</p><p>Professor Paul Lichtenstein, one of the researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, said: 'It's said that roughly 30 per cent to 40 per cent of long-serving criminals have ADHD.</p><p>'If their chances of recidivism can be reduced by 30 per cent, it would clearly affect total crime numbers in many societies.'</p><p>Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures.</p><p>Besides crime, ADHD is linked to many problems that can afflict a person's life, including poor academic performance, unemployment, alcohol and drug abuse, and relationship breakdown.</p><p>However, although the disorder is known to persist into adulthood, treatment invariably stops in adolescence.<br></p><p>British expert Professor Philip Asherson, from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London, said he would expect to see wide-ranging benefits if convicted criminals were regularly treated for ADHD.</p><p>'If they were in prison and showing aggressive or difficult behaviour, I'd hope to see a reduction in those aggressive behaviours,' he said.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2237015-0E207F4300000578-976_468x286.jpg" width="468" height="286" alt="Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures</p> <p>'I'd also expect to see more engagement with rehabilitation processes.

Martin Bell: "I have now done 18 wars and I"ll take any of them rather than the dentist"s chair"

'I have now done 18 wars and I'll take any of them rather than the dentist's chair': Under the microscope with Martin Bell | UPDATED: 01:33 GMT, 12 June 2012 The former war reporter and MP, 73, on his war wounds, losing over three stone in the past two years and when sex is important Is sex important 'Only if it means something.

Scientists could soon screen unborn babies for 3,500 genetic disorders, raising fears of an increase in abortions

Scientists could soon screen unborn babies for 3,500 genetic disorders, raising fears of an increase in abortions PUBLISHED: 00:31 GMT, 7 June 2012 | UPDATED: 09:08 GMT, 7 June 2012 Thousands of genetic disorders in unborn babies could soon be identified without the need for risky and invasive tests – raising fears of an oncrease in the number of abortions.

New genetic "map" drawn up that will give better diagnosis for breast cancer patients and more effective treatment

New genetic 'map' drawn up that will give better diagnosis for breast cancer patients and more effective treatment | UPDATED: 17:11 GMT, 16 May 2012 A genetic 'map' that could help give more accurate diagnoses of breast cancer has been drawn up, showing the varied landscape of the disease in more detail than ever before.

NHS spends 1m a week on repeat abortions: Single women using terminations "as another form of contraceptive"

NHS spends 1m a week on repeat abortions: Single women using terminations 'as another form of contraceptive' Figures reveal some women have returned for as many as nine terminations in their lifetime Repeat abortions most prevalent in London Half of all terminations carried out in Croydon were on women who had previously had at least one abortion | UPDATED: 00:44 GMT, 14 May 2012 A form of contraception: Research shows that some have seven, eight or even as many as nine terminations in their lifetime (picture posed by model) The Health Service is spending around 1million a week providing repeat abortions.

The "healthy" juice with 22 teaspoons of sugar that can add up to 450 calories to your diet

The 'healthy' juice with 22 teaspoons of sugar that can add up to 450 calories to your diet | UPDATED: 06:57 GMT, 17 April 2012 Underestimated: Survey respondents thought a portion of pomegranate juice contained four teaspoons of sugar – the true number is 22 Drinks regarded as healthy often contain far more sugar than we realise and can add up to 450 calories a day to our diet, researchers have warned.