Flu jabs are a "waste of taxpayer"s money", claim scientists who the benefits have been over-hyped

Flu jabs are a 'waste of taxpayers' money', claim scientists who say the benefits have been over-hyped<br> University of Minnesota report says benefits – especially for older people – have been over-promoted <br>New vaccine pipeline hindered as a result <br>But experts still recommend current vaccination 'as it's the best we have' <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 18:57 GMT, 22 November 2012 </p> <br><p>The benefits of the annual flu jab have been &#8216;over-hyped&#8217;, scientists claim.</p><p>They say the vaccine is far less effective than is widely believed, with some studies showing it protects less than two-thirds of the population.</p><p>The US researchers say ministers in Britain as well as America are &#8216;wasting taxpayers&#8217; money&#8217; on the jab.</p><p>And they claim that because the benefits have been so &#8216;over-promoted&#8217;, scientists have been deterred from inventing vaccines that would be far more effective.<br></p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/21/article-2236253-16257656000005DC-198_468x286.jpg" width="468" height="286" alt="Flu jabs are a waste of taxpayer's money due to the protective effects of the vaccine being over-hyped, it has been claimed" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Flu jabs are a waste of taxpayer's money due to the protective effects of the vaccine being over-hyped, it has been claimed</p> TODAY'S POLL <p>Is the flu jab a waste of taxpayers' money</p> Yes No VOTE <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix//2012/11/22/article-999-16257656000005DC-830_108x76.jpg" width="108" height="76" alt="Flu Jab" /> POLL RESULTS Close All polls Click to view yesterday's poll results DM.has("rcp", "poll", { pollId: '1033334', channelId: '1', questionId: '' }); <p>But the Department of Health has insisted the flu jabs &#8216;save lives&#8217; and urged the elderly and patients with long-term conditions to come forward for their vaccinations.</p> <p>Researchers from the University of Minnesota looked at 12,000 studies on the effectiveness and safety of the flu jab, going back to the 1930s.

Giving criminals with ADHD medication could stop them from re-offending, say experts

Giving criminals with ADHD medication could stop them from re-offending, say expertsAround four per cent of children in the UK and half as many adults are believed to suffer from ADHDCriminal behaviour in those with the disorder falls by about 30% when they are on medication, research shows <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 07:52 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <p>Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending, a study suggests.</p><p>Criminal behaviour in people diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) falls by about a third when they are on medication, the research shows.</p><p>Translated to the prison population, similar treatment could have a dramatic effect, experts believe.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2237015-020D956F000004B0-159_468x406.jpg" width="468" height="406" alt="Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Treating ADHD in convicted criminals could have a major impact on reoffending</p> <p>Around four per cent of children in the UK and half as many adults are believed to suffer from the disorder, which is characterised by over-activity, impulsivity, aggression, short temper and disorganised thinking.</p><p>But a disproportionate number of people with ADHD end up being convicted of petty crimes, often related to violence and drug abuse.</p><p> </p><p>Studies suggest that anything from 10 per cent to 40 per cent of prison inmates have the disorder, but few are diagnosed or treated.</p><p>Treating ADHD-affected children with drugs such as the stimulant Ritalin is controversial because of the side effects, which can include nervous system disturbances and raised blood pressure and heart rate.</p>CONTROVERSIAL STUDY<br><p>The research was conducted in Sweden, where it is easy to access data on medical treatments and criminal convictions through national registries.</p><p>Scientists studied the records of more than 25,000 individuals with ADHD, mostly teenagers and young adults.</p><p>They found that over a period of four years, 37 per cent of the men and 15 per cent of the women were convicted of crimes, compared with a rate in the general population of 9 per cent and 2 per cent.</p><p>Drug treatment for ADHD was associated with a 32 per cent drop in offending rates by men and 41 per cent by women – an overall reduction of about a third.</p> <p>But the study authors say such drugs could have a real impact on crime, although their use would have to be carefully considered on a case-by-case basis.</p><p>The findings are published in the New England Journal of Medicine.</p><p>Professor Paul Lichtenstein, one of the researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, said: 'It's said that roughly 30 per cent to 40 per cent of long-serving criminals have ADHD.</p><p>'If their chances of recidivism can be reduced by 30 per cent, it would clearly affect total crime numbers in many societies.'</p><p>Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures.</p><p>Besides crime, ADHD is linked to many problems that can afflict a person's life, including poor academic performance, unemployment, alcohol and drug abuse, and relationship breakdown.</p><p>However, although the disorder is known to persist into adulthood, treatment invariably stops in adolescence.<br></p><p>British expert Professor Philip Asherson, from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London, said he would expect to see wide-ranging benefits if convicted criminals were regularly treated for ADHD.</p><p>'If they were in prison and showing aggressive or difficult behaviour, I'd hope to see a reduction in those aggressive behaviours,' he said.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/22/article-2237015-0E207F4300000578-976_468x286.jpg" width="468" height="286" alt="Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Almost 27 per cent of convicted criminals released from prisons in England and Wales reoffend within a year, according to the latest Ministry of Justice figures</p> <p>'I'd also expect to see more engagement with rehabilitation processes.

Heavy drinking "kills you quicker than smoking" and poses greater risk to women than men

Heavy drinking 'kills you quicker than smoking' and poses greater risk to women than men Alcoholics die 20 years sooner on average than general population, groundbreaking study findsResearchers in Germany spent 14 years following 149 alcohol-dependent adults to produce report Death rate among alcohol-dependent women was 4.6 times higher than normal, academics found Rate among men with alcohol problems was almost twice as high as the general male population | UPDATED: 06:39 GMT, 17 October 2012 Heavy drinking kills you more quickly than smoking and is especially dangerous among women, a study suggests.

Breast cancer: NHS faces "crisis" as number of women living with disease is set to treble to 1.7m

Breast cancer timebomb fear: Experts warn that NHS faces crisis as number of women living with disease is set to treble to 1.7m Threefold increase by 2040 will be partly caused by our ageing population Macmillan Cancer Support warns of being 'prepared for dramatic increase'Better treatment and diagnosis means more women are now surviving itThis presents new challenges for NHS in practical support and after-care By Sophie Borland PUBLISHED: 23:01 GMT, 15 October 2012 | UPDATED: 23:24 GMT, 15 October 2012 Soaring numbers of women living with breast cancer will leave the NHS in crisis, researchers warn today.

If your hip clicks as you put on socks it"s an arthritis warning

If your hip clicks as you put on socks it's an arthritis warning By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 01:21 GMT, 2 October 2012 | UPDATED: 01:21 GMT, 2 October 2012 'Despite being very fit and active, there were always certain movements I struggled with,' said Iyad Elias Does your hip click when you bend to put your socks on Do you find it impossible to sit cross-legged on the floor Does your hip hurt with exercise If so, you could suffer from a ‘new’ condition, possibly a precursor to osteoarthritis.

Halving red meat consumption would slash heart disease and bowel cancer… and cut our carbon footprint

Halving red meat consumption would slash heart disease and bowel cancer… and cut our carbon footprint Reducing red and processed meat consumption would prompt a fall in chronic disease incidence of between 3 per cent and 12 per cent in Britain | UPDATED: 10:13 GMT, 11 September 2012 Cutting back on the amount of red meat people eat would reduce the risk of chronic disease and also slash Britain’s carbon footprint, according to a study.

The fourth sexual orientation: One per cent of the population now considers themselves asexual

The fourth sexual orientation: One per cent of the population now considers themselves asexualLeading academic says sexualisation of our culture has turned some into 'asexuals' with no feelings of attraction | UPDATED: 22:11 GMT, 19 August 2012 Fourth orientation: Experts believe up to 70 million people worldwide have no feelings of sexual attraction at all Around one per cent of the world's population are 'asexuals' who feel no sexual attraction at all, experts have claimed.