Money worries are causing millions of us to pile on the pounds by comfort eating

Money worries are causing millions of us to pile on the pounds by comfort eating Financial problems are causing three quarters of people to ignore diet advice and turn to comfort eating80% of us are choosing cheap food over healthy By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 09:14 GMT, 18 April 2013 | UPDATED: 09:14 GMT, 18 April 2013 Money worries are causing millions of cash-strapped Britons to pile on the pounds, according to a new report.

Why Facebook friends don"t count: People are happier and laugh 50% more when talking face-to-face

Why Facebook friends don't count: People are happier and laugh 50% more when talking face-to-face Talking on phone does not make people feel as good as sharing a smileStudy suggests quality not quantity of communication is most importantMost satisfying relationships 'come from handful of close friends' By Jenny Hope PUBLISHED: 23:24 GMT, 9 April 2013 | UPDATED: 23:43 GMT, 9 April 2013 A study has found there is no link between Facebook use and people with larger groups of friends or more emotionally intense relationships (file picture) Facebook friends are no substitute for the real thing, according to psychologists.

Getting stressed by small things could be as damaging as eating unhealthily or failing to exercise

Get stressed in traffic jams Be warned – it could be as bad for your health as eating junk food Getting stressed by everyday irritations can cause mental health problems a decade later Researchers warn that the cumulative effect of getting annoyed at small things every day is damaging By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 17:13 GMT, 3 April 2013 | UPDATED: 17:13 GMT, 3 April 2013 Getting irritated about the small things in life is just as bad for your health as eating a poor diet or failing to exercise, a new study suggests.

Lazy GPs keep on doling out powerful sleeping pills to the elderly when they should only be used as short term treatment

Lazy GPs keep on doling out powerful sleeping pills to the elderly when they should only be used as short term treatmentOne in five elderly insomnia sufferers have never had drugs reviewed by GPFour out of five of those surveyed have trouble sleeping despite taking pills By Jenny Hope PUBLISHED: 00:34 GMT, 3 April 2013 | UPDATED: 00:35 GMT, 3 April 2013 One in five elderly insomnia sufferers told a survey they have never had their drugs reviewed by a GP – which breaches official guidelines (file picture) Doctors are still prescribing powerful sleeping pills for months at a time to older people who risk becoming addicted, warn experts.

Nearly ALL doctors have given patients a placebo for the psychological benefits

Nearly ALL doctors have given patients a placebo – either to keep them happy or reassure them 97% admitted giving placebos that are not proven, such as antibiotics for a viral infection 12% had used ‘pure’ placebos, such as sugar pills, which have no medicinal value at allMost placebos given to reassure patients, or to produce a psychological effect By Daily Mail Reporter PUBLISHED: 22:58 GMT, 20 March 2013 | UPDATED: 22:58 GMT, 20 March 2013 Doctors clearly believe placebos can help patients, the research found Nearly all doctors have given their patients placebos, a study has found.

It"s official: Women ARE grumpier than men in the mornings

It's official: Women ARE grumpier than men in the morningsWomen are more angry and hostile if they get insufficient sleep, say North Carolina scientistsSleep deprivation also increases women's risk of heart disease, stroke and depression But a man's health is barely affected by lack of sleep By Daily Mail Reporter PUBLISHED: 17:15 GMT, 12 March 2013 | UPDATED: 23:30 GMT, 12 March 2013 If the woman in your life woke up grumpy this morning, don’t be too hard on her.

Women who live near their mothers are more likely to get pregnant

Women who live near their mothers are more likely to get pregnant Link remains when women are of same age, income and social class, say Essex researchersThought the psychological boost of having nearby family members may improve a woman's fertility By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 14:24 GMT, 4 February 2013 | UPDATED: 15:54 GMT, 4 February 2013 Women trying to get pregnant are more likely to succeed if they live near their mothers or other close relatives.

Don"t tell patients they"ll look better after cosmetic surgery: New guidelines that "manage expectations" are unveiled

Surgeons demand that medical professionals carry out cosmetic procedures Practitioners should not imply patients will 'look nicer' or feel 'better' Should instead use unambiguous language like 'bigger' or 'smaller' Patients should also have psychological screening before treatmentPlus 'Botox parties' should be banned, as staff often untrained figures released yesterday by the British Association of Plastic Surgeons revealed that women had: Breast enlargments: 9,854 Eyelid surgery 6,071 Face/neck lift 5,324 Breast reduction 4,217 Nose job 3,228 Tummy tuck 2,882 Fat transfer 2,641 Liposuction 2,638 (Figures for BAAPS surgeons only) 'With the demand for cosmetic surgery and non-surgical treatments rising year on year, it is crucial that the highest level of professionalism is maintained amongst practitioners.' The British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons said the new guidance was a 'step in the right direction' but called for more stringent recommendations on cosmetic surgery advertising.

GPs urged not to prescribe sleeping pills and painkillers over fears millions of Britons are addicted

GPs urged to slash prescriptions of sleeping pills and painkillers over fears millions of Britons are addicted New guidelines advise doctors to consider alternative treatments such as physiotherapy and counselling62 million prescriptions for painkillers written out every year – and another 50 million for sleeping pills By Sophie Borland PUBLISHED: 16:02 GMT, 16 January 2013 | UPDATED: 01:52 GMT, 17 January 2013 Family doctors are being told to slash prescriptions of painkillers and sleeping pills amid concerns that patients are becoming addicted.

Why the Monday blues means you should make your doctor"s appointment for the end of the week

Why the Monday blues means you should make doctors appointments for the end of the week Appointments made for the beginning of the week were missed more often than those at the endPatients may feel less able to cope with the prospect of being given bad news at the start of the working weekShifting appointments to Thursday and Friday could save NHS 60m a year, claim experts | UPDATED: 11:24 GMT, 17 December 2012 When booking a GP appointment, your best bet is to avoid the start of the week.