Friendship, not sex, is the secret to a long-lasting romantic relationship

It's not all about sex: FRIENDSHIP is the secret to a long-lasting romantic relationship A good friendship creates a more committed, loving and sexually satisfying relationship, say researchers But those who try and satisfy their own selfish desires are less likely to sustain the bond in the longer term By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 17:44 GMT, 28 January 2013 | UPDATED: 19:12 GMT, 28 January 2013 A strong friendship is the secret to a long-lasting romantic relationship, new research suggests.

Why praising your child may do more harm than good: Psychologist claims "empty" comments makes them unhappy

Why praising your child may do more harm than good: Psychologist claims 'empty' comments makes them unhappyStephen Grosz says that praise could hinder children's school performanceHe has written a book about human behaviour called The Examined Life By Sophie Borland PUBLISHED: 00:19 GMT, 14 January 2013 | UPDATED: 10:11 GMT, 14 January 2013 Praising children with phrases such as ‘well done darling’ may damage their confidence, a leading psychologist has warned.

Never too late to get fit: What to do in your 70s

Never too late to get fit: What to do in your 70s | UPDATED: 21:46 GMT, 17 September 2012 MEN: Researchers are convinced that a daily walk becomes more important the older you get, with many suggesting that 20 to 30 minutes is all that’s needed to benefit health.

Ritalin "given to children aged three" as prescriptions to treat hyperactivity soar

Chemical cosh drugs 'given to children aged three' as prescriptions to treat hyperactivity soarNumber of Ritalin prescriptions leapt from 158,000 in 1999 to 661,463 in 2010 | UPDATED: 01:25 GMT, 7 May 2012 Out of control There is evidence that children under the age of six are taking the medication Prescriptions for ‘chemical cosh’ drugs to treat hyperactivity have soared four-fold in a decade amid evidence that children as young as three are taking the medication.

We really do like to be beside the seaside, say psychologists

We really do like to be beside the seaside, say psychologists | UPDATED: 00:27 GMT, 19 April 2012 It may be something to do with the soothing sound of the waves but – in accordance with the music hall song – we do like to be beside the seaside, psychologists have confirmed.

Service with a smile hides misery of staff left feeling "exhausted and cynical"

Service with a smile hides misery of staff left feeling 'exhausted and cynical' Have a nice day The effort of always appearing friendly and cheerful comes at an emotional cost for the server It may boost your day to have a friendly waitress serving you coffee first thing in the morning. But new research has revealed service with a smile comes at an emotional cost for the server. The American-inspired dictate of always appearing friendly and cheerful with customers can leave staff feeling emotionally exhausted and cynical.