It"s true: Chocolate DOES taste better when you"re on a diet

It's true: Chocolate DOES taste better when you're on a dietScientists prove a sneaked treat always tastes betterSubjects who were made to feel guilty before 'naughty food' enjoyed it moreIt is because 'pleasure triggers guilt' and vice versa<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 12:24 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <br><p>There are few pleasures greater than guiltily abandoning the diet and tucking into a naughty slab of chocolate cake, or mountain of chips.

Hospital that operated on wrong patient and left surgical instruments inside two others is investigated by watchdog

Hospital that operated on wrong patient and left surgical instruments inside two others is investigated by watchdog <br> Within a month, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust performed four botched surgeries Eight 'never events' – instances not ever supposed to happen – have occurred since last SeptemberHealth watchdog Monitor now taking action against the trust <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 14:21 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <p>The health watchdog has been forced to take action against a hospital trust which performed a surgery on the wrong patient.</p><p>Within a month, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust performed four botched surgeries, including leaving instruments inside two patients and performing surgery on the wrong person.<br></p><p>Surgeons also operated on the wrong part of the body of another patient, the watchdog Monitor said.<br></p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/23/article-2237358-162DA9B7000005DC-226_468x328.jpg" width="468" height="328" alt="The health watchdog is taking action against Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, of which Addenbrooke's Hospital (pictured) is part of" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">The health watchdog is taking action against Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, of which Addenbrooke's Hospital (pictured) is part of</p> <p>The regulator said that since September 2011, eight 'never events' – instances which are never supposed to happen – have occurred at the trust, including four between September and October last year.<br></p><p>Monitor said it was stepping in because the trust has also failed to give cancer patients treatment in the recommended time.

Unsupervised children having more accidents because parents are too busy playing on their smartphones

Playground children having more accidents because parents are too busy playing on their smartphones Number of children admitted to hospital after playground falls has risen by a third in five yearsExperts blame the sharp rise on parents being distracted by text messages and emails Children also more inclined to take risks or misbehave when they know their parents&#8217; attention is diverted <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 17:33 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/23/article-2237034-1263F290000005DC-293_233x423.jpg" width="233" height="423" alt="Children are having more accidents in playgrounds because their parents are too busy checking their smartphones to look after them properly (picture posed by model)" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Children are having more accidents in playgrounds because their parents are too busy checking their smartphones to look after them properly (picture posed by model)</p> <p>Children are having more accidents because their parents are too busy checking their mobile phones to supervise them properly, researchers warn.</p><p>They blame a sharp rise in playground falls and mishaps in the home on their mothers or fathers being distracted by text messages and emails.<br></p><p>The number of children being admitted to hospital having fallen from playground equipment has risen by a third in the last five years, according to NHS data.</p><p>Parenting experts and doctors specialising in emergency departments believe the rise is partly fuelled by the growing use of smartphones and BlackBerries.</p><p>They also point out children are more inclined to take risks or misbehave when they know their parents&#8217; attention is diverted.</p><p>Figures from the NHS show that last year some 9,564 children were admitted to hospital having fallen from playground equipment, up from 7,232 in 2006/7.</p> <p>Researchers point out that this rise coincided with the increasing availability of BlackBerrys and smartphones, such as Apple&#8217;s iPhone, which went on the market five years ago.

Drinking lowers your risk of dying in hospital (although it increases your chance of going there in the first place)

Drinking lowers your risk of dying in hospital (although it increases your chance of going there in the first place)<br> Those with higher levels of alcohol in blood were almost 50% less likely to die from injury in hospital<br>Once protective effect is understood patients could be treated with drugs that mimic alcohol, said experts <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 16:59 GMT, 20 November 2012 </p> <br><p>Scientists have discovered a somewhat dubious benefit of drinking too much – it reduces your risk of dying if you end up in hospital.</p><p>Of course consuming too much alcohol substantially increases your chances of being injured in the first place.

Doctors withholding treatment from dying cancer patients because they think it is "futile"

Doctors 'are withholding treatment from dying cancer patients because they think it is futile to continue'<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 10:14 GMT, 21 November 2012 </p> <br> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/21/article-2236148-028B4207000005DC-10_233x423.jpg" width="233" height="423" alt="Shocking: Doctors are withholding treatment from dying cancer patients because they do not think it worthwhile, a report warns" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Shocking: Doctors are withholding treatment from dying cancer patients because they do not think it worthwhile, a report warns.

Flu jabs are a "waste of taxpayer"s money", claim scientists who the benefits have been over-hyped

Flu jabs are a 'waste of taxpayers' money', claim scientists who say the benefits have been over-hyped<br> University of Minnesota report says benefits – especially for older people – have been over-promoted <br>New vaccine pipeline hindered as a result <br>But experts still recommend current vaccination 'as it's the best we have' <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 18:57 GMT, 22 November 2012 </p> <br><p>The benefits of the annual flu jab have been &#8216;over-hyped&#8217;, scientists claim.</p><p>They say the vaccine is far less effective than is widely believed, with some studies showing it protects less than two-thirds of the population.</p><p>The US researchers say ministers in Britain as well as America are &#8216;wasting taxpayers&#8217; money&#8217; on the jab.</p><p>And they claim that because the benefits have been so &#8216;over-promoted&#8217;, scientists have been deterred from inventing vaccines that would be far more effective.<br></p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/21/article-2236253-16257656000005DC-198_468x286.jpg" width="468" height="286" alt="Flu jabs are a waste of taxpayer's money due to the protective effects of the vaccine being over-hyped, it has been claimed" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Flu jabs are a waste of taxpayer's money due to the protective effects of the vaccine being over-hyped, it has been claimed</p> TODAY'S POLL <p>Is the flu jab a waste of taxpayers' money</p> Yes No VOTE <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix//2012/11/22/article-999-16257656000005DC-830_108x76.jpg" width="108" height="76" alt="Flu Jab" /> POLL RESULTS Close All polls Click to view yesterday's poll results DM.has("rcp", "poll", { pollId: '1033334', channelId: '1', questionId: '' }); <p>But the Department of Health has insisted the flu jabs &#8216;save lives&#8217; and urged the elderly and patients with long-term conditions to come forward for their vaccinations.</p> <p>Researchers from the University of Minnesota looked at 12,000 studies on the effectiveness and safety of the flu jab, going back to the 1930s.