Cancer patients who say No to a mastectomy "more likely to survive"

Cancer patients who say No to a mastectomy 'more likely to survive' By Sophie Borland PUBLISHED: 01:15 GMT, 28 January 2013 | UPDATED: 01:16 GMT, 28 January 2013 Many women diagnosed with breast cancer choose to have a mastectomy thinking it will remove the tumours as quickly as possible and give them the best chance of survival Women stand a better chance of surviving breast cancer if they don’t have a mastectomy, a major study has found.

Doctors zap high blood pressures with radio waves: Procedure could be permanent cure

Doctors zap high blood pressures with radio waves: Procedure could be permanent cure Could provide lifeline for thousands of patients that don't respond to drugs | UPDATED: 22:55 GMT, 26 August 2012 A radical therapy that zaps the kidneys with radio waves could provide a permanent cure for high blood pressure, research shows.

Becomes mother after pioneering cervical cancer surgery

Blessed by a baby we feared we'd never have: Pioneering surgery saved woman with cervical cancer and left her still able to become a mother Katie Brown was diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2010She underwent radical surgery to save her life and her fertilitySix months later she was pregnant, much to the amazement of her doctorMiss Brown and partner Adam Holtby delayed their wedding plans Baby Ethan was born healthy by Caesarean section | UPDATED: 06:55 GMT, 20 August 2012 Like most new mothers, Katie Brown readily admits she is besotted with her baby son.

Midwives told to drop 30-second rule on cutting umbilical cord after delaying it is shown to benefit babies

Midwives told to drop ‘30-second rule’ on cutting umbilical cord after delaying longer shown to benefit babies Longer connection to mother's blood supply thought to protect babies against anaemia | UPDATED: 21:54 GMT, 18 August 2012 Guidance: Midwives have been advised to delay cutting babies' umbilical cords after new evidence showed this benefits their health A radical change in the way babies are delivered will see midwives delay cutting the umbilical cord following evidence that it improves the health of newborns.

Drinking tea can lower the risk of diabetes – but only if you drink four or more cups a day

Drinking four or more cups of tea can lower the risk of middle-aged related diabetes Drinking one to three cups has little effectFour or more reduces risk 20%Four cups a day is British average PUBLISHED: 12:30 GMT, 4 June 2012 | UPDATED: 13:59 GMT, 4 June 2012 The British habit of tea-drinking can help lower the risk of Type 2 diabetes – but only if you drink four or more cups a day.

Mothers "to have a named midwife to birth and beyond" in NHS reform of care for pregnant women

Mothers 'to have a named midwife to birth and beyond' in NHS reform of care for pregnant women | UPDATED: 07:14 GMT, 16 May 2012 Boost: Health Secretary Andrew Lansley will unveil the new measures today New mothers will today be promised one-to-one care from a midwife and more support on the NHS if they suffer from post-natal depression.

Women with high-risk breast protein "more likely to develop cancer if they drink too much"

Women with high-risk breast protein 'more likely to develop cancer if they drink too much'Alcohol link to disease was not clear until now | UPDATED: 19:36 GMT, 23 April 2012 Link: Scientists have found that women with higher levels of a particular protein are at greater risk of developing breast cancer if they drink too much alcohol (picture posed by model) A protein has been identified that plays a key role in the link between drinking alcohol and breast cancer.

NHS patients refused treatment unless they change their lifestyles

Too fat for surgery: Patients refused treatment unless they change their lifestylesNHS refuses 'undeserving' patients vital treatment in move branded 'discriminatory'Hip and knee replacements and even IVF among treatments being 'rationed'Health Service trusts insist restrictions are in people's 'best interests' The NHS has been accused of rationing vital treatments after refusing to help ‘undeserving’ patients unless they lose weight or quit smoking.