Premature twins died after being given 10 times too much morphine, nursing tribunal hears

Premature twins died after being given 10 times too much morphine, nursing tribunal hears Alfie and Harry McQuillan were born at 27 weeks in October 2010Were in a 'good condition' despite being born so early, inquest heardPrescribed morphine to stabilise them but instead given 'excessive dose'Died at scandal-hit Stafford Hospital two days later Nurse in charge, Joanne Thompson, now facing disciplinary hearingAccused of letting less senior member of staff administer wrong dose heard.

Father, 49, died from a heart attack after GP failed to investigate chest pains THREE times

Father, 49, died from heart attack after GP failed to investigate chest pains THREE times George Black attended the Temple Hill Surgery in Dartford, Kent Each time complained of chest pain he was not properly investigated Died eight days after final visit to surgery, even after tests showed problemsFamily said staff at the surgery should be 'hung out to dry' for their actions complaining of indigestion.

Some mentally ill patients may be unlawfully detained due to errors in medical records

Some mentally ill patients may be unlawfully detained due to errors in medical records 4% of sectioned patients have 'irregularities' in their records, meaning they could be unlawfully detainedThe number of people detained under the Mental Health Act rose 5% last year to 48,600Concerns that patients are not informed of their right to see a lawyer or independent mental health advocate , 4 per cent contained mistakes which called the legality of their detention into question.

Smokers who stop by 44 can live almost as long as those who never took up the habit

Quit while you're ahead Smokers who stop by 44 can live almost as long as those who never took up the habit Long-term habit cuts 10 years off your lifespanHowever, quitting by 44 gives you back nine yearsExperts add it doesn't mean you're safe to smoke into middle age as increases risk of diseases such as cancer By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 11:37 GMT, 24 January 2013 | UPDATED: 11:43 GMT, 24 January 2013 Quit while you're ahead Smokers who give up by the age of 44 were found to increase their life expectancy by nine years compared to those who continue to puff away Smokers who quit before they hit middle ages can live almost as long as people who never smoked, groundbreaking new research has found.

Giving birth in hospital raises risk of new mothers bleeding to death

Giving birth in hospital raises risk of new mothers bleeding to death | UPDATED: 00:02 GMT, 2 December 2012 Women who choose to give birth at home are less likely to suffer from life-threatening bleeding than those who have their baby in hospital, a study has found.

The body snatchers: The grisly source behind some of the most extraordinary medical discoveries

The body snatchers: The grisly source behind some of the most extraordinary medical discoveries | UPDATED: 23:53 GMT, 13 October 2012 It was one of the most gruesome finds of recent years – 262 skeletons or parts of skeletons in unmarked graves at the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel, East London.

Military mom Tiffany Klapheke “let toddler die because she was too depressed about husband’s deployment”

“I just got tired of always changing the sheets”: Military mom, 21, “let her toddler die because she was too depressed about her husband”s deployment”Tiffany Klapheke, 21, charged with three felony counts of injury to a child after her 22-month-old daughter diedAutopsy found daughter lacked basic care and was dehydrated and covered in chemical burnsAt time of death, child weighed only 17.5 poundsKlapheke admitted that she should have taken better care of her daughter

20-year-old man caught by his father trying to rape his grandmother “because he couldn’t get a girlfriend”

20-year-old man caught by his father trying to rape his grandmother “because he couldn”t get a girlfriend”. A 20-year-old man attempted to rape his grandmother after complaining to her he could not get a girlfriend.

Manmade climate change is driving outbreak of tummy bugs in Europe, claim scientists

Manmade climate change may be driving tummy bug outbreaks in Europe, claim scientists Vibrio bacteria, which is normally found growing in warm and tropical waters, now thrives in the Baltic Sea Bacteria strains will multiply as seas warm, predict researchers The bacteria causes illnesses from cholera to gastroenteritis | UPDATED: 09:55 GMT, 23 July 2012 Tummy troubles: There is increasing concern that climate change may be driving bacterial waterborne infectious diseases Climate change is driving the growth of a group of water-borne bacteria in northern Europe that can cause illnesses from cholera to gastroenteritis.