Being anxious about your relationship can make you ill – by damaging your immune system

How a bad relationship can make you ill – by damaging your immune system People stressed about their relationship produced 11 per cent more of the stress hormone cortisol They also had fewer T-cells, an important part of the immune system's defence against infection By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 18:49 GMT, 18 February 2013 | UPDATED: 19:03 GMT, 18 February 2013 Feeling anxious about close relationships could make you fall ill – by damaging your immune system.

Does no one understand you? If so, it could make you more sensitive to pain

Does no one understand you If so, you could be more sensitive to pain Physical and mental pain – such as social rejection – may be processed in the same regions of the brain But people who feel understood and valued are more tolerant to pain By Emily Payne PUBLISHED: 16:51 GMT, 4 January 2013 | UPDATED: 16:53 GMT, 4 January 2013 People who feel they are constantly misunderstood may be more sensitive to pain.

Boy, 5, takes first steps after experimental drug shrinks huge tumour growing through his body

Boy, 5, takes first steps after experimental drug shrinks huge tumour that was spreading through his body Drug has stopped spread of tumour and Alfie has been weaned off pain medicationThe drug is more commonly used as an anti-rejection drug for kidney transplant patients'It gives us hope', say parents | UPDATED: 15:52 GMT, 10 July 2012 A five-year-old boy has taken his first steps – after a 'miracle' drug helped shrink a giant and deadly tumour that was raging through his body.

Fertility breakthrough: Scientists can halt menopause with ovary transplants

'Women will have so much choice about when to have children': Scientists can stop menopause with ovary transplantsTransplanted ovaries effective for at least seven yearsBritish women could soon choose to freeze ovaries | UPDATED: 16:49 GMT, 25 March 2012 Women may soon be able to forgo the menopause after scientists hailed a major breakthrough in the success of transplanted ovaries.