Why Facebook friends don"t count: People are happier and laugh 50% more when talking face-to-face

Why Facebook friends don't count: People are happier and laugh 50% more when talking face-to-face Talking on phone does not make people feel as good as sharing a smileStudy suggests quality not quantity of communication is most importantMost satisfying relationships 'come from handful of close friends' By Jenny Hope PUBLISHED: 23:24 GMT, 9 April 2013 | UPDATED: 23:43 GMT, 9 April 2013 A study has found there is no link between Facebook use and people with larger groups of friends or more emotionally intense relationships (file picture) Facebook friends are no substitute for the real thing, according to psychologists.

Having sex can make you BRAINIER – especially in the first flushes of love

Having sex can make you BRAINIER – especially in the first flushes of love People in new relationships had more nerve growth, which boosts alertnessSex may also encourage growth of brain cells in part of brain responsible for memory and learning And protect against mental decline by bringing more nutrients to the brain By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 14:18 GMT, 5 March 2013 | UPDATED: 15:38 GMT, 5 March 2013 Sex could make you brainier: Researchers have found that couples in new relationships had accelerated nerve growth in the areas responsible for alertness Having sex on a regular basis could boost your brain power, new research suggests.

Being anxious about your relationship can make you ill – by damaging your immune system

How a bad relationship can make you ill – by damaging your immune system People stressed about their relationship produced 11 per cent more of the stress hormone cortisol They also had fewer T-cells, an important part of the immune system's defence against infection By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 18:49 GMT, 18 February 2013 | UPDATED: 19:03 GMT, 18 February 2013 Feeling anxious about close relationships could make you fall ill – by damaging your immune system.

Couples who are faithful are more fertile than those who stray

Couples who are faithful are more fertile than those who stray (at least if you're a monkey)Those who remain faithful produce 25% more offspringBirth rate difference could be down to the time it takes for new couples to get to know one anotherHaving a steady partner also reduces stress on mother By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 10:50 GMT, 25 January 2013 | UPDATED: 14:01 GMT, 25 January 2013 Couples who stay true to each other are more fertile than those who stray, new research has found.

Married women are less likely to suffer depression than cohabiters or singletons

Married women are less likely to suffer depression than cohabiters or singletons Ten per cent of married women suffered from post-natal depression, compared with 20 per cent who cohabited and 35 per cent who were singleWomen who cohabited were also more likely to suffer domestic abuse and/or abuse drugs | UPDATED: 19:10 GMT, 14 December 2012 Pregnant women who had already tied the knot were far less likely to suffer from post-natal depression than those who just lived with their other halves They say your wedding day is supposed to be the happiest of your life.

Cannabis users experience withdrawal symptoms as acute as tobacco smokers when they quit

Cannabis users can suffer same acute withdrawal symptoms as tobacco smokers when they quit Cannabis users were asked to stop taking the drug for two weeksThey experienced symptoms including insomnia, mood swings and loss of appetite | UPDATED: 13:11 GMT, 27 September 2012 People who try to quit smoking pot can experience withdrawal symptoms that affect their daily lives, according to an Australian study.

Patients have fewer complications with sympathetic doctors

Patients with sympathetic doctors are more likely to have a better outcome and fewer complications Researchers found a link between a physician's empathy for their patient's condition and the patient's outcomes The study was done by Thomas Jefferson University and Italian researchersThe relationship between diabetic patients and their physicians in Parma, Italy were evaluatedThe results support the beneficial effects of empathy in patient care | UPDATED: 19:33 GMT, 11 September 2012 Patients with more sympathetic, understanding doctors have better outcomes and fewer complications, new research suggests.