Up to 25,000 patients wrongly struck off GP lists as part of cost-cutting drive

Up to 25,000 patients wrongly struck off GP lists as part of cost-cutting drive Practice staff were told to trawl lists and strike-off any patients who have died or moved awayFollowed concern that GPs were being overpaid But thousands of genuine patients have also been removed, potentially risking their health By Sophie Borland Health Reporter PUBLISHED: 17:19 GMT, 11 February 2013 | UPDATED: 17:21 GMT, 11 February 2013 Up to 25,000 patients have been wrongly removed from GP lists in an NHS cost-cutting drive.

Hospitals hit by a vermin invasion: Rats, mice and cockroaches "putting patients at risk"

Hospitals hit by a vermin invasion: Rats, mice and cockroaches 'putting patients at risk' | UPDATED: 06:50 GMT, 10 April 2012 NHS hospitals have to call in pest controllers hundreds of times a year to deal with infestations of vermin, putting patients at risk of disease and infection.

90% of hospitals fail to check on nurses" English

90% of hospitals fail to check on nurses' English before letting them work on wardsLanguage problems only come to light when patients' requests are not understood Fewer than one in ten hospitals check whether nurses from Europe can adequately speak English before letting them work on wards, it has emerged. Language problems often only come to light when patients find that their requests for more pain relief or different food are not understood, according to an NHS watchdog. Many hospital chiefs are totally unaware that due to strict anti-discrimination rules imposed by Brussels, it is illegal for the Nursing and Midwifery Council regulator to check the English language skills of nurses trained in EU countries.

Happy pill prescriptions soar to 50m as job and money fears grow

Happy pill prescriptions soar to 50m as job and money fears grow Rise in demand is believed to coincide with job losses following economic downturn A quarter of Britons are thought to suffer from mental illness every year Soaring numbers of Britons are turning to antidepressants and other pills to combat anxiety, figures show. Last year nearly 50million prescriptions were handed out, a rise of a quarter in the past four years. The most commonly prescribed drugs include citalopram hydrobromide, amitriptyline, Prozac and diazepam